Kim Stanley Robinson’s “Galileo’s Dream”

Galileo's Dream

I know it’s been a while since I last posted, but since every contact I make with anyone in publishing bounces me back a “see you in the new year” response, it’s to be expected that we’re all operating at a slower and less frequent pace this time of year.  Though I promise to start it all rolling come the new year.

For the moment I just wanted to make the following comment:

I love science fiction!

The reason I’m making this comment is because I’m about a hundred pages into Kim Stanley Robinson’s latest book, Galileo’s Dream (which comes out today) and am loving it so far.

The story begins with Galileo, in his time, doing his thing: making incredible inventions, discovering incredible things, and changing the world.  With the development of what comes to be the telescope (and the help of a stranger) he sees the moon in a clear form that has never been witnessed before, and then turns his sights to Jupiter and its moons.  The Stranger then whisks him away to the moon Europa in the year 3020.

That’s all I’m going to say for now, as I don’t want to give too much of the story away, at least not until the review.  As I plan to interview Robinson for BookBanter, I look forward to finding out how he came up with this book, what it was that made him want to write it in such a way.  Because only in science fiction can you have a wonderful story of Galileo from the seventeenth century, and then be transported away in the matter of a second to a moon of Jupiter in the fourth millennium, over a thousand years from our time.

It does remind me a little of Dan Simmons’s Ilium and Olympos, which was another incredible science fiction epic set in our distant future.

Suffice to say, I look forward to what the rest of the book shall bring.  But if you can’t read for the review, and have to get the book right now, then just click here.

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