“The Pagan Lord” by Bernard Cornwell (HarperCollins, 2014)

starstarstarstar

Medieval historical fiction extraordinaire, Bernard Cornwell, is back with the next installment of the Saxon Tales. The Pagan Lord is the seventh in the series, with King Alfred gone and the land is on the eve of war between the Saxons ruled by Alfred’s son, Edward and Wessex; while in the north, the Danes led by the Viking Cnut Longsword looks to take more land.

Our hero, Uhtred, has had his ups and downs in the series, but now wishes to bring what men he can together and take back his inheritance in the distant north land of Bebbanburg, but he will have to fight his uncle and progeny to do that. The Christian faith is also growing in this place that will one day be called “Angeland,” and when Uhtred kills an important bishop, he finds those of the faith also warring against him.

The Pagan Lord pushes Uhtred to the very edge and beyond, bringing the reader along with him. It shows Cornwell doing what he does best, moving his characters around and pitting them against each other in magnificent battle scenes. No one Cornwell book is like the other, which is what makes him such a great writer.

Originally written on January 27, 2014 ©Alex C. Telander.

To purchase a copy of The Pagan Lord from Amazon, and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

You might also like . . .

Death of Kings  1356  Winter King

Advertisements

3 thoughts on ““The Pagan Lord” by Bernard Cornwell (HarperCollins, 2014)

  1. I finally got around to reading a Cornwell novel, Agincourt, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I’ve now downloaded his first books in a couple of different series (including the Saxon Tales) and am looking forward to reading more.

    • “Agincourt” was fantastic for encapsulating that important moment in time. Pretty much everything Cornwell does it great. His Arthur trilogy is wonderful; his Thomas of Hookton longbow archer series is fascinating. And his Saxon tales are brilliant and apparently his bestselling series to date. I tried his Sharp series, but couldn’t get into it; the medieval period is more my penchant.

      Also, way back when I got a chance to interview him, which you can listen to here.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s