Bookbanter’s Best Reads of 2014

Top Reads

.1.

The Slow Regard of Silent Things by Patrick Rothfuss: Rothfuss takes a short break from working on the the third Kingkiller Chronicle to show readers and fans a unique and in depth look at one of his strongest characters, Auri.

.2.

[REVIEW]

Snowblind by Christopher Golden: Golden brings you his best novel to date in this truly chilling horror story that uses a cold language and will have you yearning for hot tea or cocoa and trying not to be scared out of your skin.

.3.

[REVIEW]

Words of Radiance by Brandon Sanderson: In the impatiently-awaited second installment of the Stormlight Archive Sanderson does what he does best, moving his characters along and opening up new plots and story lines that will just blow the reader’s mind.

.4.

[REVIEW]

Influx by Daniel Suarez: From the bestselling author of Daemon comes a daunting tale of an impossible world we dread might exist, where technology is far more advanced than we ever could have imagined, and ideas that we consider science fiction are in fact in existence right now.

.5.

[REVIEW]

The Martian by Andy Weir: Another story about a trip to Mars gone wrong, only this one is so well-researched and detailed that each page is a nail-biting shocker, as you wrap your mind around the concept of what it’s like to be stranded on a distant planet.

.6.

[REVIEW]

Wayward Pines Trilogy by Blake Crouch: A story about a town where everything isn’t as quaint and idyllic as it seems, but when the protagonist starts to unravel what’s behind the fake facade, it turns out to be far much worse and unbelievable.

.7.

[REVIEW]

Spectrum by Alan Jacobson: Karen Vail is back and this time she returns to her old haunts in New York to check out an old and unsolved case, and readers get to see how Vail became the great agent she is today.

.8.

[REVIEW]

The Sixth Extinction by Elizabeth Kolbert: We are living in an unprecedented time where things just continue to get worse and worse; The Sixth Extinction shows what that catastrophic effect looks like and its ramifications.

.9.

[REVIEW]

Lock In by John Scalzi: In his new novel, Scalzi plays around with the idea about those who are different and somewhat outcast by society and wish to be accepted and not have their disability “cured.”

.10.

[REVIEW]

Kronos Rising by Max Hawthorne: An ancient creature from the deeps arises and decides it likes the taste of human flesh and blood. What if Jaws was in fact a much more terrifying giant marine dinosaur?

.11.

[REVIEW]

The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith: In the follow-up to the successful Cuckoo’s Calling, Galbraith presents a picture of the British publishing world and when a well-known but not so beloved authors turns up in a horribly murdered, private detective Comoran Strike finds himself in some hot water.

.12.

Desert God by Wilbur Smith : Smith returns to ancient Egypt, a world he knows well, and his beloved character, Taita, who is now quite old but still possessed of great might and even greater intelligence, as he leads his people across a great land in a dangerous mission.

.13.

[REVIEW]

S. by J. J. Abrams and Doug Dorst: In a truly monumental undertaking, S. is a work of art that is a great book with magnificent props and details that will boggle the mind.

.14.

Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami (translated by Jay Rubin): Murakami is back with another tale of some truly unusual characters who are close friends and then one of their members is ostracized and he knows not why and so, later in life, must begin his pilgrimage to answer this question.

.15.

Mr. Mercedes by Stephen King: King takes a turn to mystery and sleuthing with a retired cop, Bill Hodges, who may not be so retired and out of practice as he thought.

.16.

[REVIEW]

The Pagan Lord by Bernard Cornwell: Cornwell continues his Saxon Tales series with this sixth installment featuring the tough pagan, Uhtred, looking to reclaim his stolen home, Bebbanburg.

Top Graphic Novels

.1.

[REVIEW]

Saga Volume 3 by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples: In the third volume of this award-winning, terrific series, our main characters (as well as some enemies) take a trip to Quietus and meet an old friend.

.2.

[REVIEW]

The Harlem Hellfighters by Max Brooks and Caanan White: The author of World War Z turns to a truly remarkable graphic novel story about the African-American infantry regiment during World War I.

.3.

[REVIEW]

Climate Changed by Philipe Squarzoni: A sobering graphic novel tale about how far climate change has come and how we are at the point now where things can’t be suddenly changed and it will take centuries for the planet to return to the state it once was.

.4.

[REVIEW]

In Real Life by Cory Doctorow and Jen Wang: A story about a young gamer girl who learns about gold farmers and a whole world on the other side of the planet she never knew existed.

.5.

The Wake by Scott Snyder and Sean Murphy: An original story epic in scope about an invader that takes over the world and controls it for some time, but there are those few who still have hope that there is a way to stop them.

.6.

[REVIEW]

Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh:  A collection of the popular online comic strip that goes beyond just being funny but has some important life lessons and advice for readers.

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