“The Witch Who Came in From the Cold, Episode 9: Head Case” by Max Gladstone (Serial Box, 2016)


This is the ninth episode in the series; reviews for all other episodes can be found here.

Things are moving into place for a huge and secret operation for the CIA known by the codename ANCHISES. Agent Gabe Pritchard would really like to not screw this one up and totally ruin his career. Things would be a lot easier if he didn’t have a golem on his back.

Rookie CIA operative Joshua Toms gets picked to meet with an operative who happens to be the big contact for ANCHISES. It’s his first big operation and he’s nervous as hell, but he also knows it’s an important stepping stone in his career. And since he kind of got caught recently revealing his affections for a certain man, he needs to show this isn’t going to affect him at all and he’s a great agent.

Meanwhile Gabe now has a golem following him and what’s even creepier is the thing’s starting to look like him. He tries every magical trick up his sleeve but nothing seems to work to stop or even slow the thing. With the help of Jordan Rhemes and a parchment of skin, Gabe has something that might affect the golem now, he just has to get the parchment into its head somehow.

And then things go from bad to worse when Gabe is at the specific location for Joshua’s operation and the golem happens to be looking for him in the basement. Gabe enlists some help . . . Actually, he basically begs Ice operative Tatiana Morozova to help him out.

Tensions are building in The Witch Who Came in From the Cold, and “Head Case” ends on one of the biggest cliffhangers of the series so far.

Originally written on March 3, 2016 ©Alex C. Telander.

To purchase a copy of The Witch Who Came in From the Cold, Episode 9: A Head Case from Amazon, and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

Book News: Books About Libraries, Bookstagramming, One Sitting Tomes & More!

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Fifty Shades of Grey 
A charity bookstore in England came up with an interesting project for their many, many copies of Fifty Shades of Grey.

Getting Philosophical
Here are some philosophical books to get you through these challenging political times.

Book Shorts 
James Patterson is starting a new style of reading with really short books to be read in one sitting.

[read more . . .]

“Working for Bigfoot” by Jim Butcher (Subterranean Press, 2015)


Jim Butcher, author of the bestselling Dresden Files, released his first short story collection, Side Jobs, in 2010, but he continues to write stories set in the Dresden universe for various anthologies, and it’s probably going to be a while before he releases his next collection. Thankfully, he is releasing his collected bigfoot stories with Subterranean Press.

Working for Bigfoot features the three stories (so far) where Harry Dresden helped out a client he clearly respects, the bigfoot Strength of a River in His Shoulders. In each of the stories, Dresden ends up having to help the bigfoot’s son, Irwin, whose mother is human. So while he looks like a normal person – albeit very big and muscley – as he grows through his teenage years he begins to develop his “abilities” as the son of a bigfoot. Naturally, there are those who can sense the power and ability within him and wish to prey on that. It’s up to Dresden to help keep the kid out of trouble.

The stories are classic Dresden Files, but also about Harry’s growing respect for young Irwin, and the world of magic that is the bigfoot.

Originally written on April 16, 2015 ©Alex C. Telander.

To purchase a copy of Working for Bigfoot from Amazon, and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

“Tortured Souls: The Legend of Primordium” by Clive Barker (Subterranean Press, 2015)


For those who have wondered about one of the great horror writers who goes by the name Clive Barker, but have never read any of his work, they would do well to sample the novella Tortured Souls. It encapsulates this talented author in a limited number of pages, showing his skill at revealing a short story, with memorable characters, and some dark and bloody plot that will leave you gasping.

The “first city” of Primordium is renowned throughout history for its upheavals and political changes and at its heart lives a being whose origin is unknown and whose existence is enigmatic to say the least, known by many names, but most commonly Agonistes. If you wish, he will transform you to your heart’s desire, whether it is for love or revenge, but know that it will be an agony you have not felt before.

In this novella we learn of the wondrous city of Primordium and some of its inhabitants and their desires and hates, as well as the power that Agonistes wields and how once you are transformed by him, there is no turning back, whether you wish to or not.

Originally written on November 14, 2014 ©Alex C. Telander.

To purchase a copy of Tortured Souls from Amazon, and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

“Legion: Skin Deep” by Brandon Sanderson (Subterranean Press, 2015)


As bestselling author Brandon Sanderson takes a break from writing his epic fantasy novels, he turns to his ongoing novellas. Readers first learned of Stephen Leeds in Legion, a man who has the unique ability to create hallucinatory manifestations that only he can see who aid him in life and answer the questions he has. When he is done with them, they do not disappear but remain to aid him in his freelance work in solving mysteries and the occasional police case.

In Legion: Skin Deep Leeds is hired by Innovative Information Incorporated to recover a stolen corpse whose very DNA contains new technology and information that will change the world; whether for better or worse depends on how quickly he finds that body. In return he will be made far richer than he already is and will no longer have to worry financially.

The second installment into Legion brings a great story and more insight into this enigmatic character, as well as laying some important groundwork for where Sanderson wants to go next with his character, and revealing there is plenty more story to tell.

Originally written on November 14, 2014 ©Alex C. Telander.

To purchase a copy of Legion: Skin Deep from Amazon, and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

Book News: Bookstore of the Future, Audiobooks With a Female Voice, What To Read Based on What You Watch & More!

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Book Recommendations Based on TV Shows 
So here are some recommendations based on what TV shows you like to watch.

What About Waingro?
Michael Mann launches book imprint; Heat prequel novel a priority.

Netflix Comics on Your Phone 
Stela, a new original comic book subscription service for your smartphone.

[read more . . .]

“Rolling in the Deep” by Mira Grant (Subterranean Press, 2015)


Mira Grant, of Feed and Parasite, is back with a great novella about mermaids, except these aren’t the beautiful sirens of the sea, but more the demons of the deep type.

The Imagine Network is known for producing quasi-documentary shows that are more a blend of fact and fiction, with some impressive special effects that viewers have come to expect and enjoy. And now they’re going to start filming their biggest and most expensive project yet: to find a real mermaid. Along with the standard film crew, there are a number of scientists, a full crew to pilot the mighty ship Atargatis, and a group of professional mermaids who pretend to be these fabled creatures. The Imagine Network isn’t going to stint on any facet of this production, and the entire group will be heading to the Mariana Trench, located in the extreme emptiness of the Pacific Ocean, at the deepest hole on the planet.

It is here each of the scientists will be conducting their studies and research, while the group of fake mermaids frollick in the waters, and the film crew does their thing. Only no one is really sure what that green light is deep in the water and when something comes up to say hi with all its teeth, everyone starts to become a believer.

Rolling in the Deep is Mira Grant at her best, turning a conventional story completely on its head and giving you some great horror to boot, along with some fun scientific research that will make the reader think. While Grant seems a little fancy free with some of the nautical research, overall the story is just a lot of fun with great characters and a plot that will keep your interest piqued until the last bloody page.

Originally written on January 1, 2015 ©Alex C. Telander.

To purchase a copy of Rolling in the Deep from Amazon, and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

“The Witch Who Came in From the Cold, Episode 8: Cover the Silence” by Cassandra Rose Clarke (Serial Box, 2016)


This is the eighth episode in the series; reviews for all other episodes can be found here.

The episode features an unexpected meeting between two unlikely characters: Sasha Komyetski, a high level operative in the KGB, and Zerena Pulnoc, wife to the Soviet ambassador, as they discuss the special radio that Sasha confiscated from Tatiana Morozova. As the reader and listener wonders what these two might be up, the next scene opens up with Jordan Rhemes once again having to deal with a couple of Flame operatives who would really like to take over everything at the Bar Vodnar. And then we get our first outright magical dueling scene, as the operatives work together casting spells, while Jordan uses charms and has her own tricks to combat them.

Meanwhile, Zerena is holding a mighty gala where every who’s who is there, including plenty of members of the KGB and CIA, as well as various other clandestine groups, all watching each other’s every move. The reader and listener gets to see all this through the ambassador’s wife’s eyes, as she pays a visit to the important members on each side, as well as a new arrival from the States, one Dominic Alvarez. We see all the facial expressions and nervous ticks that tell Zerena all she needs to know. The episode ends with the ambassador’s wife paying her own visit to Jordan for a specific item and an important fact is revealed about her.

What makes this episode so interesting is that it is a digression from the series so far, as readers and listeners get to see everything through secondary characters. The main characters who have been showing up in every episode so far may be seen in this episode but we don’t know what they’re thinking. It’s all about what the background people see and think. We also learn that this is important, for they have just as important a stake in the whole operation as do our lead protagonists and antagonists.

Originally written on March 5, 2016 ©Alex C. Telander.

To purchase a copy of The Witch Who Came in From the Cold, Episode 8: Cover the Silence from Amazon, and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

“The Witch Who Came in From the Cold, Episode 6: A Week Without Magic” by Michael Swanwick (Serial Box, 2016)


This is the sixth episode in the series; you can read reviews of the other episodes here.

After the magic fireworks bonanza of Episode 5 of The Witch Who Came in From the Cold, Episode 6 is well titled as there is no magic really going on in this episode of the story, and it is more a return to the Cold War clandestine espionage that the story is truly about at its heart. And its written by bestselling science fiction author Michael Swanwick. Having a variety of different authors writing the episodes is what makes this series so interesting, for while the characters remain the same, each episode has its own unique feel to it that is a product of that particular author’s thoughts and writing style.

It is a cold January in Prague and apparently in the spy world – much like the regular one – that means audit season. In this episode we get to see what that means from both sides of the Cold War. In the American side there are lots of accountants checking everything out and having agents filling out lots of seemingly needless paperwork. CIA agent Gabe Pritchard gets assigned an entire binder to complete that defend and quantify his every action over the last six months. So Gabe does what he does best and talks his way out of it with the accountant, proclaiming he would be committing treason is he were to complete the binder.

Meanwhile, on the Soviet side audit season has a slightly different feel to it, as everyone is on their best behavior and walking on eggshells around all these new people in the KGB who are checking into every file and detail. Tanya Morozova has a meeting with her boss Sasha Komyetski and one of the auditors from Moscow Center to spy on one of her coworkers. And then there is a washed out spy named Magnus know as the Norwegian who Gabe sends Tanya’s way and she decides to put him in touch with a recruiting member of the consortium of Ice.

Originally written on March 3, 2016 ©Alex C. Telander.

To purchase a copy of The Witch Who Came in From the Cold, Episode 6: A Week Without Magic from Amazon, and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

Ostium I

Around a year ago, after listening to the podcast Welcome to Night Vale for a little while, I was inspired and came up with my own podcast idea for an ongoing series. I had a reader in mind, a friend of mine, who was on board to do it. But the year got away from us as things got busier and busier. I had the first episode in a rough first draft.

One of my writing goals for this year is to get more episodes written and get this podcast, called Ostium, up and running.

We’re now working our way through March and things are moving along with the podcast. I went through four drafts with the first episode and got it to a point where I was satisfied, and my friend is now working on the recording. He sent me a snippet the other day and it sounded awesome! I’m really excited.

It’s definitely in the vein of certain podcasts I’ve been enjoying which I blogged about recently.

This week I got started on writing episode 2 and just finished it up tonight. And future episodes are taking shape as the podcast finds its direction.

Looking forward to seeing where this goes by the end of the year.

Stay tuned to this space for news about when the podcast will be available for eager ears.