Ostium Mini Episode: Season One Musicology Part 1

The first of a two-part series on the musicology of Ostium Season 1, where Alex C. Telander sits down with Chris Fletcher – the voice of Jake and the composer behind the music – and talks about how the music for Ostium started, how he works, what some of his influences are, and much more.

Ostium now has a merchandise store, check it out.

If you want more Ostium, why not become a patron on our Patreon page, where for just $2 a month you’ll get access to an exclusive brand new mini episode every two weeks (and this includes all through the offseason); and during the regular season of the show you’ll get access to new episodes a full week before everyone else. Alternatively, you could also make a one-time donation and help support Ostium on our website.

And if you wouldn’t mind leaving Ostium a review on whatever app or program you use to listen to podcasts and that way people can see what you’re saying to convince them to listen to Ostium.

Thanks for listening and see you in two weeks.

 

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Ostium Short Minis: Ten Questions with Sara & Ten Questions with Alex

In the third of the four-part “Ten questions” series, listeners get to hear from our resident artist, Sara Warren.

Music featured in this mini episode is by Komiku courtesy of the Free Music Archive.

Ostium now has a merchandise store, check it out: www.redbubble.com/people/ostiumpodcast/shop?asc=u

If you want more Ostium, why not become a patron on our Patreon page www.patreon.com/ostiumpodcast, where for just $2 a month you’ll get access to an exclusive brand new mini episode every two weeks (and this includes all through the offseason); and during the regular season of the show you’ll get access to new episodes a full week before everyone else. Alternatively, you could also make a one-time donation and help support Ostium on our website, www.ostiumpodcast.com.

And if you wouldn’t mind leaving Ostium a review on whatever app or program you use to listen to podcasts and that way people can see what you’re saying to convince them to listen to Ostium.

Thanks for listening and see you in two weeks.

In the final of the four-part “Ten questions” series, listeners get to hear from yours truly, Alex C. Telander, writer and producer for Ostium.

Music featured in this mini episode is by Marcos H. Bolanos courtesy of the Free Music Archive.

Ostium now has a merchandise store, check it out: www.redbubble.com/people/ostiumpodcast/shop?asc=u

If you want more Ostium, why not become a patron on our Patreon page www.patreon.com/ostiumpodcast, where for just $2 a month you’ll get access to an exclusive brand new mini episode every two weeks (and this includes all through the offseason); and during the regular season of the show you’ll get access to new episodes a full week before everyone else. Alternatively, you could also make a one-time donation and help support Ostium on our website, www.ostiumpodcast.com.

And if you wouldn’t mind leaving Ostium a review on whatever app or program you use to listen to podcasts and that way people can see what you’re saying to convince them to listen to Ostium.

Thanks for listening and see you in two weeks.

Vote for Ostium!

audioverse1

For the first time, the Ostium Podcast is up for some Audioverse Awards. Show your love and appreciation, or let others know about this strange show about a very strange place. Click on the banner above or the logo below or follow this link. And here are the categories Ostium is nominated in.

Best Original Composition for an Ongoing Production
The Ostium Theme Song by Chris Fletcher for The Ostium Podcast

Best Original Composition for a Dramatic Production
The Ostium Theme Song by Chris Fletcher for The Ostium Podcast

Best Original Composition for a New Production
The Ostium Theme Song by Chris Fletcher for The Ostium Podcast

Best Audio Engineering for an Outgoing Production
Alex C. Telander for The Ostium Podcast

Best Audio Engineering for a dramatic Production
Alex C. Telander for The Ostium Podcast

Best Audio Engineering for a New Production
Alex C. Telander for The Ostium Podcast

Best Writing for an Ongoing Production
Alex C. Telander for The Ostium Podcast

Best Writing for a New Production
Alex C. Telander for The Ostium Podcast

Best Ongoing Production
The Ostium Podcast

Best Dramatic Production
The Ostium Podcast

Best New Production
The Ostium Podcast

Best Actress in a Supporting Role for a Dramatic Production
Georgia Mackenzie as Monica in The Ostium Podcast

Best Actress in a Supporting Role for a New Production
Georgia Mackenzie as Monica in The Ostium Podcast

Best Actor in a Leading Role for a Dramatic Production
Chris Fletcher as Jake Fisher in The Ostium Podcast

Best Actor in a Leading Role for a New Production
Chris Fletcher as Jake Fisher in The Ostium Podcast

audioverse2

Ostium Short Minis: “Ten Questions with Chris” & “Ten Questions with Georgia”

In the first of the four-part “Ten questions” series, listeners get to hear from the voice of Jake Fisher and all around music guy, Chris Fletcher.

Music featured in this mini episode is courtesy of the Free Music Archive.

In the second of the four-part “Ten questions” series, listeners get to hear from the talented voice of Monica.

Music featured in this mini episode is by Komiku courtesy of the Free Music Archive.

Ostium now has a merchandise store, check it out.

If you want more Ostium, why not become a patron on our Patreon page, where for just $2 a month you’ll get access to an exclusive brand new mini episode every two weeks (and this includes all through the offseason); and during the regular season of the show you’ll get access to new episodes a full week before everyone else. Alternatively, you could also make a one-time donation and help support Ostium on our website, www.ostiumpodcast.com.

And if you wouldn’t mind leaving Ostium a review on whatever app or program you use to listen to podcasts and that way people can see what you’re saying to convince them to listen to Ostium.

Thanks for listening and see you in two weeks.

 

“Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI” by David Grann (Doubleday, 2017)


David Grann fans have been waiting for his next book – much as I have – impatiently for some time. After the both fascinating and adventurous Lost City of Z (with the movie coming close to release), and the entertaining and thrilling collection of articles, The Devil and Sherlock Holmes, Grann turns to a new subject, the Osage murders and the birth of the FBI in Killers of the Flower Moon, a story that is both sobering and compelling. Few may be completely familiar with this unique story, but by the end of the book, will be unable to forget.

As a New York Times staff writer, David Grann is used to diving very deep into a story, and not coming up for air until he’s gleaned every detail and piece of evidence he can from it. In the 1920s, the people of the Osage Indian Nation of Oklahoma were among some of the richest on the planet because vast amounts of oil was found on their land. For the oil tycoons to get at that oil, the Osage had to be paid and paid well. And then, strangely, hauntingly, members of the Osage began to disappear one by one; bodies turned up, dead, mutilated, horribly murdered. And for those that chose to investigate, they often met an unexpected end; the local law enforcement were not required to do anything about it, choosing to turn a blind eye.

The fresh and new Federal Bureau of Investigation, run by a young director, J. Edgar Hoover, wanted to put a stop to this, to end these horrific killings, and make the bureau look like the shining beacon of law enforcement and protection that Hoover wanted it to be for the American people. Hoover tapped the shoulder of a former Texas Ranger, one Tom White, to try to get to the bottom of the mystery. What follows is the riveting story of how this was done, how the perpetrators were found, how the murderers were eventually, finally brought to justice, and how those of the Osage nation were able to find some peace in all this death.

Grann’s Killers of the Flower Moon is one of those books that goes beyond a story, to something greater and more important. The reader is left wondering why we don’t all know this story, why it isn’t taught in history classes, why more hasn’t been done for those who have already suffered so much. One hopes Grann will receive some weighty awards for this moving book, as it will serve to get many others across the world to read it and learn of this incredible and tragic story.

Originally written on July 23, 2017 ©Alex C. Telander.

To purchase a copy of Killers of the Flower Moon from Amazon, and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

Ostium Mini Episode: EMU #6 – The End of the Beginning

In the final EMU mini episode of the season, Dave finally makes it to the States. The question remains whether he can find this secret town called Ostium, and if and when he does, will he find Jake and Monica inside?

Written and performed by Alex C. Telander.

Warning, this episode contains explicit language.

Ostium now has a merchandise store, check it out.

If you want more Ostium, why not become a patron on our Patreon page, where for just $2 a month you’ll get access to an exclusive brand new mini episode every two weeks (and this includes all through the offseason); and during the regular season of the show you’ll get access to new episodes a full week before everyone else. Alternatively, you could also make a one-time donation and help support Ostium on our website, www.ostiumpodcast.com.

And if you wouldn’t mind leaving Ostium a review on whatever app or program you use to listen to podcasts and that way people can see what you’re saying to convince them to listen to Ostium.

Thanks for listening and see you in two weeks.

“The Prey of Gods” by Nicky Drayden (Harper Voyager, 2017)


Book covers have a way of catching your eye, whether it’s on an Amazon Kindle recommends page, or your browsing in one of the last physical bastions of the dying printed word (AKA a bookstore). Nicky Drayden’s debut novel, Prey of Gods, is one of those covers that can pull you from across the room, as you hone in to inspect further, wondering what’s going on here. Like a work of art, the more you see of it, the more details are revealed and add to its overall complexity: whether it’s the future looking buildings under a silver sky, the giant robot holding a small science fiction-looking umbrella, or the little African girl with a look on her face that can be interpreted in a plethora of ways. Is she vengeful? Malicious? Demonically possessed? Or just pleased? What the cover does do is force you to turn it and read its wonderful words within, as you are drawn into a story unlike any other, and you won’t be able to stop until you finish its last page.

Our story takes place (for the most part) in South Africa where it is the near future and there is hope for many at various social and class levels. Just as today almost everyone has a cellphone, in this world almost everyone has a personal robot who is more than a servant, computer and personal companion; these robots becoming family to their masters. Genetic engineering is pushing ahead the frontiers of reality and science, but at the same time in a small village there are those of ancient times who posses a power within them that hasn’t been unleashed in some time. Gods, goddesses, and godlings are coming back, whether humanity wants them to or not.

Big changes are coming. A new hallucinogenic drug is taking hold of the populace that seems to grant strange powers and abilities to those under the influence, seeming to make them superheroes. Then there is an AI uprising beginning, as these personal bots link together, forming their own sentience, and questioning the role and power of their supposed masters. Meanwhile, one of those ancient gods has a nefarious plan to bring herself back to an omniscient power.

The fate of the world falls on a young Zulu girl who possesses her own powers but doesn’t fully understand them yet. Will she ultimately know what to do and save humanity?

The Prey of Gods is bursting with complex, varied and fascinating characters that make the story all the more engaging. Readers will be hooked to every page not knowing where the story will go next, and loving the journey as they are taken to other worlds, many different minds – be they human, god or artificial – and to the very edge of it all. With an ending that satisfies, The Prey of Gods is a stunning debut from Drayden that fans of the fantasy genre won’t soon forget.

Originally written on July 23, 2017 ©Alex C. Telander.

To purchase a copy of The Prey of Gods from Amazon, and help support BookBanter, click HERE.