Audio Interviews

Audio Interviews & Episodes

Audio interviews are where Bookbanter really first started, in showcasing reviews and exclusive interviews with authors.  To hear the interview, click on the episode title link, or the LISTEN link.  If you wish to download the interview, you can also right-click and use save-as.

Episode 1: Premiere Episode (October 13, 2008) — This first episode of the BookBanter podcast features fourteen book reviews, including Cathedral of the Sea by Ildefonso Falcones, Clapton: The Autobiography by Eric Clapton, The Living Dead edited by John Joseph Adams, and Victory of Eagles by Naomi Novik. [32:26] . . . LISTEN

Episode 2: Brandon Sanderson (November 8, 2008) — The first interviewee on BookBanter is none other than bestselling author Brandon Sanderson, of the Mistborn trilogy and The Gathering Storm with Robert Jordan. In this interview find out all about what Sanderson is doing with The Gathering Storm, how he got started writing, and what he’s working on next. [29:32] . . . LISTEN

Episode 3: Book Reviews (January 15, 2009) — This episode features twelve book reviews, including: The Terror by Dan Simmons, The 7th Victim by Alan Jacobson, The Tales of Beedle the Bard by J. K. Rowling, and The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman. [38:27] . . . LISTEN

Episode 4: Dan Simmons (March 1, 2009) — In this episode I had the chance to meet and interview Dan Simmons at a signing. He talks about what got him into writing, where the idea for Drood came from, and how much work and research it took, as well as some info on his next novel, Black Hills. [30:49] . . . LISTEN

Episode 5: Bernard Cornwell (April 1, 2009) — In this episode I had the opportunity to interview one of my favorite authors, who I grew up reading. Bernard Cornwell talks about how he got into writing, why he wanted to write Agincourt, and hints at what he’s working on next. Included in the episode are a number of reviews, including the new translation of The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer, Contagious by Scott Sigler, The Somnambulist by Jonathan Barnes, and The Thing About Life is That One Day You’ll Be Dead by David Shields. [29:42] . . . LISTEN

Episode 6: Amber Benson (April 15, 2009) — While in LA I had the chance to interview the wonderful Amber Benson, who played Tara on Buffy the Vampire Slayer. She talks about her writing history, where she got the idea for Death’s Daughter, and a little about the next book featuring Calliope Reaper-Jones, Cat’s Claw. [23:59] . . . LISTEN

Episode 7: Mary Roach (May 1, 2009) — For the paperback release of Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex, I was able to interview Mary Roach, who talked about how she got started writing such interesting books, all the work and research she had to do for Bonk (including making her and her husband’s bodies available for science), and what her next book is all about. Included in the episode are the reviews for Bonk and Blueberry Girl by Neil Gaiman and Charles Vess. [27:04] . . . LISTEN

Episode 8: Daniel Suarez (May 15, 2009) — Find out what Daniel Suarez’s background is and why he wanted to write the techno-thriller Daemon, what sort of research it required, and what he plans to do in the sequel, Freedom. [30:32] . . . LISTEN

Episode 9: James Rollins (June 1, 2009) — James Rollins is the bestselling author of a number of books, and in this episode you get to hear the specific events that led to him becoming a published author, and what “special box” he uses to get his ideas from. Included in the episode are the reviews for his books: The Doomsday Key and his first children’s book, Jake Ransom and the Skull King’s Shadow. [41:33] . . . LISTEN

Episode 10: Michael J. Sullivan (June 15, 2009) — Michael J. Sullivan is a relatively new author to the publishing world. Find out in this episode why he stopped writing, and what it was that got him started again to get his books published in his series, The Riyria Revelations. Included in the episode are the reviews for the first two books in the series, The Crown Conspiracy and Avempartha. [33:57] . . . LISTEN

Episode 11: Robert J. Sawyer (July 1, 2009) — Science fiction author, Robert J. Sawyer, has won just about every science fiction award there is. In his latest book, Wake, he explores the world of a blind girl and a sentient presence on the Internet. Find out where he got the idea for this book, how much work and research it took, and where he sees the other two books in the trilogy going. He also talks quite a bit about the ABC series adaptation of his book Flash Forward. [43:08] . . . LISTEN

Episode 12: Christopher Golden (July 15, 2009) — Christopher Golden has written a number of books in the genres of horror and fantasy, as well co-authoring books with Amber Benson, Mike Mignola, and Tim Lebbon. In the interview he tooks of how he got started writing, and the different projects he’s currently working on, including a young adult series under a pseudonym. [35:35] . . . LISTEN

Episode 13: Douglas Preston (August 1, 2009) — Douglas Preston is the bestselling author of a number of books with Lincoln Child. In this interview he talks about his latest book with Child, Cemetery Dance, the research behind the book, and the interesting writing system he and Child have when writing a book. Preston also talks a little about their next book together, as they conduct some suspicious actions for the sake of research. The episode includes the reviews for City of Thieves by David Benioff, Physics of the Impossible by Michio Kaku, and Always Looking Up by Michael J. Fox. [32:55] . . . LISTEN

Episode 14: Josh Neufeld (August 16, 2009) — We will never forget the devastating effects of Hurricane Katrina on the city of New Orleans and Louisiana. In the graphic novel, AD New Orleans After the Deluge, Josh Neufeld tells the story of six people who survived the catastrophe. In the interview he talks about where he got the idea for the book, how he found the people to tell their stories, and what he hopes people will get from reading his book. [31:26] . . . LISTEN

Episode 15: Seanan McGuire (October 15, 2009) — Joe Schreiber is a horror writer with some dark secrets to tell in his recent books, No Doors No Windows, and Star Wars Deathtroopers. In the interview he talks of how he got started writing, how he landed the job of writing a Star Wars novel about zombies, how he researched the novel, and what he’s working on next. Included in the episode are the reviews The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins, Distant Early Warnings edited by Robert J. Sawyer, and Alcatraz and the Evil Librarians by Brandon Sanderson. [28:28] . . . LISTEN

Episode 16: Mike Carey (September 15, 2009) — Mike Carey, apart from being a graphic novel writer of such popular series as Lucifer and Hellblazer, has also penned a number of novels in a continuing series involving his main character, the exorcist, Felix Castor. In this interview he talks about where Castor came from, his new comic book series, The Unwritten, and the ancient dinosaur of a computer he writes on. [30:12] . . . LISTEN

Episode 17: Kathryn Fox (October 1, 2009) — In recognition of Domestic Violence Awareness month, I was given opportunity to interview Australian author Kathryn Fox, all the way down under, as she shared stories of her career as medical practitioner, and how she got interested in forensic medicine, and what it was that made her turn to writing about this important subject. As Kathryn says in the interview: “We want sexual assault and domestic violence awareness to become as focused, important, and as center stage as the other cause being respected this month: Breast Cancer Awareness.” Featured in the episode is the review for Her Fearful Symmetry by Audrey Niffenegger. [28:20] . . . LISTEN

Episode 18: Joe Schreiber (October 15, 2009) — Joe Schreiber is a horror writer with some dark secrets to tell in his recent books, No Doors No Windows, and Star Wars Deathtroopers. In the interview he talks of how he got started writing, how he landed the job of writing a Star Wars novel about zombies, how he researched the novel, and what he’s working on next. Included in the episode are the reviews The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins, Distant Early Warnings edited by Robert J. Sawyer, and Alcatraz and the Evil Librarians by Brandon Sanderson. [28:28] . . . LISTEN

Episode 19: Alan Jacobson (November 1, 2009) — Alan Jacobson spent a number of years researching with FBI and has shown what he knows in his strong, female character, Karen Vail, with The 7th Victim and now Crush. In the interview he talks of how and why he researched with the FBI, where Karen Vail came from, and how accuracy in his work is most important. [39:22] . . . LISTEN

Episode 20: Garth Nix (November 15th, 2009) — Garth Nix has written a number of bestselling children’s books and in this interview talks about what got him into writing, how he ended up writing more books in the Old Kingdom Series, and how he treats his writing like a day job, going to the office during regular hours. The first of four interviews recorded at the World Fantasy Convention. Included in the episode are the reviews Dreams of the Dead by Thomas Randall, Flesh by Richard Laymon, and The Box by Richard Matheson. [33:50] . . . LISTEN

Episode 21: Ken Scholes (December 5, 2009) — Ken Scholes is the author of Lamentation and Canticle, the first two in his Psalms of Isaak series. In the interview he talks about the events that led him to publishing his first novel, where sees the rest of the series going, other projects he’s working on, and how his life has been changed for the better with twins. The second of four interviews recorded at the World Fantasy Convention. Included in the episode are the reviews for Depraved by Bryan Smith and Leviathan by Scott Westerfeld. [32:14] . . . LISTEN

Episode 22: Jeff VanderMeer (December 15, 2009) — Jeff VanderMeer has done a little bit of everything, from publishing fantasy books, to editing anthologies with his wife, to going on book tours, and writing presentation tours. In his latest book, Booklife, he puts it all together and presents an insightful book for writers of every level. In the interview he talks of why he wanted to write Booklife, as well as the story of his latest fiction book, Finch, as well as the process for his wife and him when they put together anthologies. The third of four interviews from the World Fantasy Convention. Included in the episode are the reviews for Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins, Last Night in Twisted River by John Irving, and The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown. [23:56] . . . LISTEN

Episode 23: Guy Gavriel Kay (January 1, 2010) — Guy Gavriel Kay is the bestselling author of a number of historical fiction novels including Tigana and The Lions of Al-Rassan. In the interview he talks all about his latest book, Under Heaven, set in medieval China, how he researched the subject, how he thinks it will be perceived by Asian audiences, and his whole process when researching and writing a book. He also picks his favorite world, out of all his books, to live in. Included in the episode are reviews for By Blood We Live edited by John Joseph Adams, The Court of the Air by Stephen Hunt, and The Customer is Not Always Right by A. J. Adams. [26:20] . . . LISTEN

Episode 24: S. G. Browne (January 15, 2010) — S. G. Browne’s debut novel is all about what would if you woke up one day and you were a zombie. How would you be treated and perceived by friends, family, and society. In the interview, Browne talks about where the idea for Breathers came from and how he made the effort not to read other zombie fiction and works, as well as how much work it took to get Breathers published. He also talks about what he’s working on next. Included in the episode are the reviews for Nyphron Rising by Michael J. Sullivan, The Electric Church by Jeff Somers, and A Mage of None Magic by A. Christopher Drown. [32:04] . . . LISTEN

Episode 25: Cherie Priest (February 1, 2010) — Cherie Priest is the author of the fantastic Steampunk book, Boneshaker, and in this interview talks about how she got into writing, the big reason behind wanting to write Boneshaker, what possible sequels she has planned for it, set within the same universe, and the strange things she likes to get up to in her free time. Included in the episode are the reviews for The Vikings by Robert Ferguson and The Unwritten Volume 1 by Mike Carey and Peter Gross. [23:00] . . . LISTEN

Episode 26: David Grann (February 15, 2010) — David Grann is a staff writer for the New Yorker, who pens fascinating articles about the mysterious and unusual. In this interview his talks about his book, released last year, The Lost City of Z, about one of the world’s last explorers — an Indiana Jones type — who disappeared in the Amazon. He also talks about his process for writing articles, where the ideas come from and how he researches them, as well as discussing his new book Sherlock Holmes and the Madman, collecting a number of his published articles. Included in the episode are reviews for The Greatest Show on Earth by Richard Dawkins and Altar of Eden by James Rollins. [35:14] . . . LISTEN

Episode 27: Seth Grahame-Smith (March 1, 2010) — Seth Grahame-Smith is the author of the internationally bestselling, run-away success novel, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. In the interview he talks about how he was given this concept for a book and the work it took to create it, as well as discussing his new book, Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, and where the idea for that book came from. Grahame-Smith also talks about other projects he is working, what his writing schedule is like, and whether he’d like to be a vampire or not. [30:32] . . . LISTEN

Episode 28: Kim Stanley Robinson (March 15, 2010) — Kim Stanley Robinson is the author of the award winning Mars trilogy, as well as The Year of Rice and Salt. In this interview he talks about his new book, Galileo’s Dream, where he got the idea for the book, what sort of research it took, and how it was exactly written. He explains his process in writing and what his favorite part of writing and publishing is. He also talks about what he likes to get up to in his spare time, and hints at what his next novel will be about. The episode includes reviews for A Local Habitation by Seanan McGuire, The Burning Land by Bernard Cornwell, and Carrion Comfort by Dan Simmons. [30:43] . . . LISTEN

Episode 29: Penny Arcade (April 2, 2010) — The great minds behind the successful online comic, Penny Arcade, discuss how they come up with ideas for their comic, what the process entails, what’s Child’s Play, what one can expect when attending one of their conventions, and what their new book — The Splendid Magic of Penny Arcade — is all about. [24:12] . . . LISTEN

Episode 30: Katharine Beutner (May 15, 2010) — Katharine Beutner’s first novel, Alcestis, is set in Mycenaean Greece. Alcestis is a princess from Greek mythology, made popular in the Euripides play of the same name. Alcestis sacrifices herself in place of her husband and is taken to Hades, where she is soon rescued. Beutner gives the reader Alcestis’s viewpoint, what she went through and how she felt. In the interview, Beutner talks about why she wanted to write this book, how she got it published, and how much research she took. She alsk talks about what she’s working on next, what she likes to in her spare time, and if she could live in Mycenaean Greece, would she? [28:32] . . . LISTEN

Episode 31: Cory Doctorow (June 15, 2010) — Cory Doctorow keeps himself busy with his nonstop writing and publishing of books, his many blog postings, the work he does for Boing Boing, as well as raising a child. He is the author of a number of books including Little Brother and Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom. His latest books are Makers for adults and For the Win for young adults.In this interview, Cory Doctorow talks about what is was that got him into writing, how he got started with Boing Boing, where he got his idea for Makers from, and the new book he’s working on. He also talks about where he thinks technology and the Internet are head in the near future. Featured in the episode are my reviews for Makers, For the Win, Under Heaven by Guy Gavriel Kay, and Audrey’s Door by Sarah Langan. [24:59] . . . LISTEN

Episode 32: Richard Doetsch (July 15, 2010) — Richard Doetsch is the author of the heavily researched Thieves series, including The Thieves of Heaven, The Thieves of Faith and the fortcoming Thieves of Darkness (August 24, 2010). His latest book is the thriller, The 13th Hour, telling the compelling story of a man who finds his wife dead and with the aid of a time-traveling pocket watch travels an hour back in time for twelve hours, hoping to discover his wife’s killer and stop him or her before the murder is committed. In the interview, he talks about how he went from being a successful business man to becoming a professional writer, his daily method of coming up with a new and original story idea each day, how he wrote The 13th Hour as a personal dare in one month, and what he likes to do for fun. [38:31] . . . LISTEN

Episode 33: Justin Cronin (August 2, 2010) — Justin Cronin is the author of The Summer Guest and Mary and O’Neil, and the first book in a epic trilogy about vampires and a post-apocalyptic world called The Passage. In the interview, Justin talks about how he got started writing, where the ideas and storylines for The Passage came from (totally worth hearing), why he began writing The Passage, who some of his influences are, and how he feels readers should handle dealing with an almost 800 page book. [32:14] . . . LISTEN

Episode 34: A Selection of Book Reviews (September 4, 2010) — A selection of book reviews including some “From the Vault” and kid’s choices. “Coyote” by Allen Steele, “Reckless” by Andrew Gross, “Freedom” by Daniel Suarez, “Deep Fathom” by James Rollins, “Black Hills” by Dan Simmons, “Abarat” by Clive Barker, and “Coraline” by Neil Gaiman. [18:07] . . . LISTEN

Episode 35: A Further Selection of Book Reviews (September 15, 2010) — The episode features the following book reviews: Tongues of Serpents by Naomi Novik, Flood and Ark by Stephen Baxter, Pariah by Bob Fingerman, Warrior of Rome by Harry Sidebottom, New York by Edward Rutherfurd, Cro-Magnon by Brian Fagan, Test by William Sleator, and Little Brother by Cory Doctorow. [19:55] . . . LISTEN

Episode 36: Mitchell James Kaplan (October 1, 2010) — Mitchell James Kaplan is a historical fiction author of By Fire, by Water, a book about the turbulent period of fifteenth century Spain between the Moors, Christians, and Jews. In the interview he talks about how he became a writer, where By Fire, by Water came from (as well as the origin of the title) and what he’s working on next. [22:53] . . . LISTEN

Episode 37: Dan Wells (November 1, 2010) — Dan Wells is the author of I am Not a Serial Killer and the recently released Mr. Monster. He likes to begin his readings with: “I am not a serial killer. My book is an autobiography.” His protagonist, John Wayne Cleaver, is a fascinating teenager who has his own issues to deal with, but when there’s a serial killer on the loose, John pushes these thoughts aside and does what he does best: gets into the mind of a cold-hearted murderer. In the interview, Wells talks about how he got started writing, where he got the idea for John Wayne Cleaver, how many other books there will be, and a little on what else he’s working on. You’ll find out the unusual location of his everyday writing office and what hobbies he likes to get up to in his free time. [27:07] . . . LISTEN

Episode 38: Brandon Sanderson (November 15th) — Brandon Sanderson is the bestselling author of the Mistborn trilogy and will be soon starting work on the final book of the Wheel of Time series, after completing The Gathering Storm and Towers of Midnight. Two years ago — almost to the day — I had my first interview on BookBanter with Brandon Sanderson. Back then he had just begun work on the Wheel of Time series, after releasing the concluding volume of the Mistoborn series. We did the interview after a reading and signing, out in the open, with little interruption. With the release of Sanderson’s own brand spanking new ten-book series, The Stormlight Archive, with The Way of Kings, and the recent release of the second to last Wheel of Time book, Towers of Midnight, I thought it would be fitting to have Sanderson be the first second interview with the same person on BookBanter, on the second anniversary of the podcast. This time, I was only given a fifteen minute window before a huge signing (there was no time for a reading) in a back office. I knew at the time of the original interview with Sanderson, that the next time would be a big affair, but I had no idea how big. In the short but detailed interview, Sanderson talks about how he was able to get two extremely long books written and published in one year, why he thinks he won’t have any books out for a while, and some secrets to his favorite hobby: RPGs! [16:52] . . . LISTEN

Episode 39: N. K. Jemisin (December 15th)N. K. Jemisin is the author of The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms and The Broken Kings, the first two books in the Inheritance Trilogy. In this interview, Jemisin talks about how she got started writing, where she got the idea for “The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms,” and what the final book in the trilogy will be about. She also has some advice for writers looking to get published, and goes in to detail about another big project she’s working on. [33:27] . . . LISTEN

Episode 40: Salman Rushdie (January 4th, 2011) — Salman Rushdie is an author that most people know in one way or another.  He is the winner of the Booker Prize (what has been called the British equivalent of the Pulitzer), he has been appointed a Knight Bachelor by Queen Elizabeth II, and has had a fatwā issued against him for his book The Satanic Verses.  His latest book is Luka and the Fire of Life, a fantasy tale about a boy whose father is sick and it is necessary for the boy – Luka – to travel into a fantasy world and capture some of this “fire of life” to cure his father; but he is up against unbeatable odds: no one has ever made through this fantasy world and survived; no one has ever managed to capture the fire of life; and no one has ever made it back to the real world with the fire of life.  The book was written for his second son, after he originally wrote Haroun and the Sea of Stories, for his first son; they’d each asked for a story they could read and enjoy. At a recent signing at the wonderful Kepler’s Books and Magazines, Rushdie took a moment to do an interview with BookBanter and Kaye Cloutman of the San Francisco Book Review. Angela from Kepler’s Books and Magazines also provided a question during the interview. Rushdie talks about how and why he became an author, the steps he needed to take to write a children’s fantasy novel, as well as some advice for writer’s living under oppression. Many thanks to Angela and everyone at Kepler’s Books and Magazines for helping to organize the interview, and for being so accommodating. Also thanks to Jared Emerson-Johnson for cleaning up the interview and making it sound awesome. [15:48] . . . LISTEN

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One thought on “Audio Interviews

  1. […] Audio: Audio interviews feature exclusive author interviews with the likes of Brandon Sanderson, Mary Roach, Justin Cronin, James Rollins, and many more.  These interviews can be listened to or downloaded for free.  You can find the audio interview page here. […]

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