Upcoming Interviews on BookBanter

Here’s a listing of upcoming interviews on BookBanter for the next couple of months leading up to December.

[Updated 09/28: I realized there was a noticeable lacking of female authors being interviewed, and since I had one more spot open for the year, I set-up an interview with Juliet Eilperin, who wrote Demon Fish, which is schedule to go up November 1st]

 

Coming October 1st

Alan Jacobson

Alan Jacobson

Inmate 1577

Author of Inmate 1577


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Coming October 15th

Rober Charles Wilson

Robert Charles Wilson

Spin

Author of Spin and Axis

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Coming November 1st

John Barnes

Elizabeth Eileperin

Demon Fish

Author of Demon Fish

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Coming November 1st

John Barnes

John Barnes

Directive 51

Author of Directive 51 and Daybreak Zero

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Coming November 15th

Ben Loory

Ben Loory


Stories for Nighttime

Author of Stories for Nighttime and Some for the Day

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Coming December 1st

Ernest Cline

Ernest Cline

Ready Player One

Author of Ready Player One

Coming Soon to a BookBanter Near You . . .

First off, let’s get the tough news out the way: Borders Roseville #130 is no more.  We closed the doors yesterday for the last time and I am no longer an employee for this company that’s only going to be around for another couple of weeks.  You can read all about my thoughts (as well as various author’s) in my most recent BookBanter Column, “Thank You Borders.”

And that’s that, until I find a new job, I have lots of time on my hands, which means lots of reading and writing, and book reviewing, and more interviews and updates on BookBanter.

Tomorrow I’ll be putting up the next interview, with Cameron Stracher, author of the young adult dystopian novel, The Water Wars.  And in the pipeline are interviews with Alan Jacobson, author of Inmate 1577; John Barnes, author of Directive 51; Ben Loory, author of Stories for Nighttime and Some for the Day; and Robert Charles Wilson, author of Vortex.  And that will all be coming up over the next couple of months.

In the meantime, the latest BookBanter Boon giveaway ends tonight at 11:59PM PST, so if you’re interested in entering to win a couple of free books, be sure to leave a comment on that post linked above.

What’s on Tap For BookBanter . . . Simon Pegg, John Barnes, & Cameron Stracher

Simon Pegg

Simon Pegg

Coming up on BookBanter on July 1st is an exclusive written interview with Simon Pegg, know for his popular movies, Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz, Paul and the truly fantastic TV series, Spaced.  He has also written a very entertaining biography, Nerd Do Well.

 

John Barnes

John Barnes

John Barnes is the author of numerous books, including the most recent post-apocalyptic books — the first and second of a trilogy – Directive 51 and Daybreak Zero.

Directive 51    Daybreak Zero

Cameron Stracher

Cameron Stracher

Cameron Stracher is the author of the entertaining young adult dystopian novel, Water Wars.

Water Wars

“Daybreak Zero” by John Barnes (Ace, 2011)

Daybreak Zero
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John Barnes sets the stage in Directive 51 by ending the world as we know it, and bringing to life a new, altered one as the diminished population tries to restart civilization.  But just when it seems like the right start to getting things back to some semblance of order, people soon find out that the terrifyingly brilliant movement known as “Daybreak” isn’t completely finished yet, plus when its comes right down to it, people overall are just selfish and greedy, especially when their lives are at stake.

Heather O’Grainne not only has a new world to contend with, but a newborn to also take up her time, nevertheless she’s going to keep doing her job and getting her viewpoint in no matter what; she was after all one of the very few people on the planet who knew about Daybreak without being a member of the movement.  The nation is still very divided, primarily with two different populations on either side of the country, doing what they can do get by.  Meanwhile Heather is challenged with a diverse team of scientists, engineers, spies, and anyone else she thinks she needs in the small town of Pueblo, Colorado to start putting the country back together again.  As she begins putting together reconnaissance from across the country, the news isn’t good: growing groups that come to be known as “tribals” are amassing and they are relentless in their capturing of those different from them, engaging in torture to whatever means to find out what their prisoners know.  And then there’s the mechanism of Daybreak that still seems to be in full swing and attacking them somehow; the question is whether this is planned or part of some automated system.

Overall it appears that Barnes has a pretty bleak view on humanity, and yet readers will certainly be able to identify actions and events in Daybreak Zero that have certainly reared their ugly heads throughout our own tumultuous history.  Nevertheless, his analytical detail is fascinating in these different populations and groups and what they do to survive and improve their lives.  At times the book drags and could’ve used some editing to speed it up and quicken developments, but Daybreak Zero is an interesting sequel that doesn’t answer all the questions by any means, setting up for the third book in the series.

CLICK HERE to purchase your copy from Bookshop Santa Cruz and help support BookBanter.

Originally written on June 9, 2011 ©Alex C. Telander.

“Directive 51” by John Barnes (Ace, 2010)

Directive 51
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Stories about the end of the world are real popular right now, especially if they involve a devastating disease, zombies, vampires, or perhaps somehow all of the above.  John Barnes’ Directive 51 is about the end of the world – or at least the end of the United States – but doesn’t involve any of these elements; people cause the end of the world.  The key to Directive 51 is that nothing is predictable and you have no clue what’s going to happen next.

In this world everything ends subtly and quietly at first.  Heather O’Grainne is the Assistant Secretary  for the Office of Future Threat Assessment, and with a truly crack team, has spent her time studying a strange group known as “Daybreak,” only she is unable to trace it to any specific people.  The deeper she gets, the more it seems like Daybreak may not in fact be tied to any specific group, but is instead a developing movement with members numbering in the thousands or possibly tens of thousands throughout the world.  Then a number of strange incidents begin to take place: the kidnapping of the vice president who was on a secret mission no one knew about; the failure of various types of machinery throughout the country; the “melting” of any products made from gasoline in select locations that is quickly spreading.  The problem is the Office of Future Threat Assessment seems to be at least a couple steps behind these Daybreakers, and before they know it, it seems there’s no way to stop what’s happening.

The events of the book are seen through characters in the government, who invoke Directive 51 (which does actually exist) to maintain the governing and ruling of the country in the event of a truly catastrophic event.  Interesting and diverse characters are developed at first, but as the book progresses a number of them get pushed by the wayside, as the story grows and at times becomes overbearing.    Nevertheless, by the end readers will be wondering what is to happen to this very changed place that was once the United States.

CLICK HERE to purchase your copy from Bookshop Santa Cruz and help support BookBanter.

Originally written on June 7, 2011 ©Alex C. Telander.