Book News:Airport Bookstores, Patterson Murders King, Classic Failures & More

0e91f-bookreporttelander

James Patterson Kills Stephen King
In James Patterson’s latest Bookshot thriller is one to ruffle some feathers, in The Murder of Stephen King.

For People who Judge Bookworms
There are many of us and we are mighty, but there are some who mock us (because of their jealousy) and this is how we fight back.

Amazon Device Pop up stores
Amazon has a big plan to make a bunch of pop-up stores and make their devices more available to customers.

[read more . . .]

“End of Watch” by Stephen King (Scribner, 2016)


In the final volume of the Bill Hodges Trilogy, as we know with Stephen King, he’s going to be pulling out all the stops and things ain’t going to be pretty, and with a title like End of Watch, you know the ending is going to be anything but happily ever after. Retired detective now turned geriatric private dick Bill Hodges got pushed to the limit in Mr. Mercedes with a true psychopath. In Finders Keepers things took a turn in a different direction, but Hodges was still well tested. In this final showdown, unsurprisingly, it all comes back to the Mercedes Killer, where it all started, even though he’s a comatose vegetable rotting away in Room 217 of the Lakes Region Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic.

Bill Hodges gets a call from an old friend in the force to come check out a strange suicide, and brings along his partner in crime, Holly. As they learn more about the case they discover it has some strange ties to the Mercedes Massacre, but the connecting link is anything but obvious. Hodges is drawn back into the case he thought he was done with. He stopped seeing Mr. Mercedes, Brady Hartsfield, when he was told to by Holly. But it seems Brady’s not done with whatever he started and somehow even though he’s little more than a helpless body, behind his eyes, in his brain there’s something going on. There’s a power that gives him control over others. Hodges just has to figure out how and why before a lot more people get hurt. He also has an important doctor’s appointment he keeps skipping out on, because he’s pretty sure – with the intense pain in his side that’s isn’t going away – it’s bad news.

Readers may be a little disappointed with the concluding volume of the trilogy, after the fun wild ride that was Finders Keepers, that King brings it back to Brady Hartsfield. By the end of the book the story has its definite King flair, but is a little thin and simple, with the end being pretty predictable and straightforward.

Originally written on July 12, 2016 ©Alex C. Telander.

To purchase a copy of End of Watch from Amazon, and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

King Capsule No. 1

kingcapsule

Here’s your premiere dose of the master of horror, one Stephen King. In this first King capsule you will be introduced to four of King’s most popular and well known novels that you might want to start with when beginning with this author. Since he has published 54 novels as of March 2016 (and that’s not including short story collections), this is a lot medicine to swallow.

So it is best taken in small, simple, capsule form.

‘Salem’s Lot (1975): Every horror writer has one, and this is Stephen King’s take on the vampire story. In the quaint small town of Jerusalem’s Lot, or ‘Salem’s lot as some locals call it, or The Lot as others do, things are not always as they seem. Ben Mears grew up here and there are certainly some skeletons hiding in his closet about the town. But now he’s looking to star anew and has moved into the old Marsten home where he plans to write his new book, possibly about the history of the historic mansion; he’s not sure yet. There’s also this cute girl in town who he used to know, and he’s starting to get real friendly with her. There are also some strange things going on in the Lot, and during the day it all seems a little too quiet.

Pet Sematary (1983): Losing a beloved pet can be really hard on a family, especially on a child, so what if there was a way of bringing said beloved pet back from the dead? The Creeds are about to find out. They’ve just moved into this lovely old house in rural Maine that’s close to a road that sees a lot of traffic. And sadly the pet cat finds this out the hard way. But deep in the woods behind the house is a pet cemetery, only there’s something really creepy about it, other than the jagged sign that reads “Pet Sematary.” Also if this place can bring things back from the dead, does that just apply to animals?

Misery (1987): Paul Sheldon is the bestselling and popular author of the Misery Chastain novels. But he’s written the last one and is finally done with character. That is until he gets in a horrific automobile accident from which he barely survives and is nursed back to health by Annie Wilkes, who just happens to be Sheldon’s number one fan. Only she’s not happy with how the last book ended, not happy at all. She wants him to write a new Misery novel, a better one, and if he doesn’t write it like she tells him to, then she’s going to have to teach him a lesson.

The Tommyknockers (1987): Bobbi Anderson is a pretty successful writer living in the fictional town of Haven, Maine. Her old friend Gardener is back; he’s done well as a poet, but also has an alcohol problem. But for Bobbi, she’s doing pretty great with herself, that is until she finds that strange chunk of metal sticking out of the ground near her house. Curiosity gets the better of her and she starts to dig it up, wondering what it is. Only, she can never quite find the edge, as it keeps getting bigger and bigger. The more of it she unearths, the more she’s certain it’s something not from this planet.

Book News: Writing Spaces, Graphic Memoirs, Pat Conroy RIP & More!

b9fb4-bookreporttelander

Dark Tower Casting 
The movie adaptation of Stephen King’s opus has cast its two leading roles and they’re amazing.

American Gods Casting Update 
The TV series adaptation of the Neil Gaiman bestseller has added a notable lead actor to its cast.

Remembering Pat Conroy 
On the passing of this bestselling author.

[read more . . .]

“The Bazaar of Bad Dreams” by Stephen King (Scribner, 2015)


To date, Stephen King has published seven short story collections, proving that the prolific writer is still a big fan of the short form. This latest collection, The Bazaar of Bad Dreams, has perhaps one of the more horrifying and chilling covers to grace the front of a book in some time. But this makes sense, since many of the stories in the pages of this collection are both chilling and horrifying. The Bazaar of Bad Dreams is perhaps King’s best collection of stories since his debut collection Night Shift.

The anthology kicks off with “Mile 81” where there is an old abandoned vehicle at a defunct rest stop that has a tendency to absorb everything that touches it; one might even say eats. In “The Dune” a man can see people’s futures written in the sand. “Morality” is the story of the collection that really makes you think, as a couple must decide whether they will perform a certain act for a large amount of money, and whether their relationship can survive because of it.

What happens when you die? King decides to present his thoughts in “Afterlife.” In “UR” an ereading device has special powers. “The Little Green God of Agony” is a story about pain in its many forms and if it had a physical presence, what it would look like. “Obits” is a story about a journalist who causes bad things to happen to people when he writes their obituaries. The collection also features King’s novella “Blockade Billy” in its entirety, about an old baseball player who had certain “abilities,” as well as King’s most recent short story published in the summer of 2015, “Drunken Fireworks.”

For those wondering why so many readers love everything King does, the many great stories in The Bazaar of Bad Dreams makes it easily convincing. The anthology has a little bit of everything: ghost stories, psychological thrill rides, captivating thrillers, and moving stories of fiction. You will not be disappointed.

Originally written on January 17, 2016 ©Alex C. Telander.

To purchase a copy of The Bazaar of Bad Dreams from Amazon, and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

You might also like . . .

    

Book News: Gaiman Speaks! King Honored! Sacks Remembered! Mieville Adapted! Book Club Reinvigorated! & More!

 

179d6-bookreporttelander

Obama Honors Stephen King 
In addition to Sally Field and Alice Waters, Stephen King was awarded the 2014 National Medal of Arts.

Worldreader & Opera 
Worldreader, a global nonprofit dedicated to improving literacy in the developing world through digital books, has partnered with Opera Software to extend reading to even more people.

Neil Gaiman Interview 
In a recent interview, bestselling author Neil Gaiman talks about writing and his books, and more importantly also about censorship.

[read more . . .]

“Finders Keepers” by Stephen King (Scribner, 2015)

Finders Keepers
starstarstarstar

It may just be coincidence that both Stephen King and J. K. Rowling writing as Robert Galbraith feature writers getting horribly murdered in the sequels to their successive thriller series, in Finders Keepers and The Silkworm respectively. But then they are both extremely popular authors who are now writing outside of their usual genre and having a great time doing it.

In the second novel featuring the now private detective Bill Hodges, most of the book focuses on the story of renowned author John Rothstein, who is brutally killed by Morris Bellamy for money and a significant number of notebooks featuring unpublished works the world has never seen. Because the items are too hot to sell, Bellamy buries them and soon gets caught for rape, beginning a very long life sentence.

Years later Pete Saubers finds a buried trunk with some special notebooks. There is also a large amount of money. The question is should Pete turn in what he has found to the authorities, or perhaps use the money to help his family who are in deep financial troubles and at risk of divorce?

King is clearly having a lot of fun writing in this genre, as Finders Keepers is a well-developed and well-crafted mystery that builds on a strong and interesting foundation. This is one of those Stephen King books where you really enjoy the two hundreds pages of setup. Then the last third of the book is thrilling action, keeping the reader on the edge of their seat, wondering how it’s all going to work out.

Originally written on July 7, 2015 ©Alex C. Telander.

To purchase a copy of Finders Keepers from Amazon, and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

You might also like . . .

Revival  Doctor Sleep  Joyland

“Dark Screams: Volume One” edited by Brian James Freeman and Richard Chizmar (Hydra, 2014)

Dark Screams Volume 1
starstarstar

Ebooks have and are continuing to change the way we read books, with shorter chapters and a growing popularity in short stories, ideal for reading on your particular ereader on the go just about anywhere. When it comes to horror, you want to make sure you find a good story to enjoy, and the first volume of Dark Screams features some big names in the genre and at a very reasonable price.

The opening story and high-point of the collection, “Weeds” by one Stephen King, is about a meteor that crashes to the earth and the weedy alien life upon it begins to grow in this world as well as on one of its inhabitants. The next story keeps the thrill and chill going with “The Price You Pay” by Kelley Armstrong about the price of debts, and how some can never be repaid.

Sadly, the collection goes downhill from there with the remaining three stories from Bill Pronzini, Simon Clark and Ramsey Campbell doing little to stimulate the mind and are just dark and don’t really go anywhere whether it’s about a strange member of an asylum or a doomed person trapped in a chamber of torture. Nevertheless, Dark Screams: Volume One is worth the read for a reader looking to experiment in the genre.

Originally written on December 8, 2014 ©Alex C. Telander.

To purchase a copy of Dark Screams: Volume One from Amazon, and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

“Revival” by Stephen King (Scribner, 2014)

Revival
starstarstarHalf star

Revival is the sort of book Stephen King would inevitably write, and I mean this in a good way. It’s classic King of the 2000s: not an outright horror story, but definitely with some terrifying elements that give you shivers, some memorable “Kingly” characters, and a story that just makes you wonder.

Revival is a coming of age story for Jamie Morton, unsurprisingly, in a small, quaint New England town where everybody knows each other, and expects to see each other at church on Sunday. And at the Methodist church there’s a new preacher in town, one Reverend Charles Jacobs. Jamie met him the other day and instantly took a liking to him, and soon pretty much everyone is a fan of the new preacher, making Sunday School now a well-attended event, while Mrs. Jacobs soon becomes the apple of a many a boy’s eye.

Revival also features magic, of a sort. The Reverend Jacobs has some interesting hobbies that Jamie gets to see in his special shed where he invents unique devices that seem to use a new form of energy and would likely be very popular if they were sold worldwide. Jacobs jokes about doing this one day, when his experiment is complete. It is then that Jamie starts to realize that his might be more than a hobby, perhaps more of an obsession. But then tragedy strikes the Jacobs family and when the reverend recants his faith and decries the inexistence of God to his congregation, he leaves town.

Revival then follows Jamie’s life becoming a guitarist as a teenager and playing in various bands through his twenties, living the life of a nomadic musician traveling from town to town. He also adopts the rock star life and becomes addicted to drugs, because he is a Stephen King character after all. He is at an all time low with his heroin addiction when he meets the Reverend Jacobs again.

Revival is a story of many things and the title aptly applies to many of them. It’s about Jamie’s life and life choices, and Jacobs and what he hopes to accomplish with his inventions. While the eventual reveal of Jacobs’s “quest” is somewhat disappointing (as is the case with a number of King’s endings), overall Revival is an exciting and contemplative read that will leave you contemplating numerous things.

Originally written on January 13, 2015 ©Alex C. Telander.

To purchase a copy of Revival from Bookshop Santa Cruz, and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

You might also like . . .

Doctor Sleep  Joyland  Wind Through the Keyhole

Guest Post: Top Five Novels That Make Great Holiday Gifts This Year

A book can make a heartfelt present – it is not only a thoughtful extension of your likes and interests, but also an invitation for the gift’s recipient to join in on the adventure of the book you love.

So, for this holiday season, no matter what genre you are looking for or who you are shopping for, one of these five best-selling books will be sure to impress that special someone.

Doctor Sleep by Stephen King (4 stars)

Genre: Horror and Paranormal

In September, Stephen King finally released his much-anticipated sequel to the 1977 The Shining and boy, is it good. We are brought back to the terror and madness introduced in the original and meet a much older, middle-aged Dan Torrance (the son, and “redrum” Danny in The Shining).

Years after the events that occurred in The Shining, Dan has followed in his dad’s footsteps of alcoholism and cynicism. Eventually, he settles down and takes a job in a nursing home, comforting the elderly and becoming known as “Doctor Sleep”. There is a traveling group of psychic vampires called the “True Knot,” who feed on children with “the shining.” Dan meets a 12-year old girl named Abra Stone, who possesses similar powers, and the demons he once repressed come back to haunt him as he tries to protect Abra from the True Knot.

This book is sure to impress friends and family who are fans of Stephen King’s past work, and other horror-genre lovers who aren’t already King aficionados. For those who want to enjoy the film adaptation of King’s story, The Shining is now streaming on DirecTV, and there are talks of a Shining prequel film in the works called The Overlook Hotel.

The Cider House Rules by John Irving (5 stars)

Genre: Coming-of-age

An oldie but a (classic) goodie, the 1985 novel The Cider House Rules by John Irving is a great gift to give this season. Featuring well-developed characters and covering heavy topics, this novel is perfect for the teenager you just can’t figure out what to get.

It is a classic and beloved coming-of-age novel that follows the life of Homer Wells, an orphan who never was adopted, and Dr. Wilbur Larch, a saint and obstetrician at the orphanage. We watch Homer grow up and learn under Wilbur, as Wilbur learns to love Homer as a son. When Homer finds out a dark secret about Wilbur, he leaves the orphanage and starts a new life on an apple orchard. In the end, we watch Homer fill the shoes of Wilbur and handle the issues of abortion, relationships and love.

This is a case of “read before you watch,” as the 1999 film adaptation starring a young Tobey Maguire does not live up to Irving’s writing.

The Circle by Dave Eggers (4 stars)

Genre: Sci-Fi, Thriller

One of my favorite authors, Dave Eggers, also responsible for What is the What, just released this new thriller, which reads like the prequel to George Orwell’s 1984. The Circle is perfect for the Sci-Fi fans, tech buffs, and Dave Egger enthusiasts like myself.

We are introduced to Mae Holland who has just been hired to work for the Circle, a tech company that’s eerily reminiscent of Google which creates one online identity and a new form of transparency for web users. The Circle believes that “Secrets Are Lies and Privacy is Theft”. However, the Circle has its own secrets and Mae is forced to confront the challenging issues of privacy and the ever-increasing power of technology over our society. The novel encapsulates a modern technology and social media centered dystopia and reflects the fears of today’s society over technology.

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn (3.5 stars)

Genre: Crime, Mystery

Gone Girl is a surprising and fresh tale for the person on your list who loves to solves a good old fashioned mystery. The novel follows a married couple, Amy and Nick, as Amy disappears and Nick becomes the main suspect. Flynn alternates between Nick and Amy’s points of view, and we are strung along by lies and twists by both parties. It is not your conventional thriller; we have untrustworthy protagonists and are led away from the average love stories that are commonly mingled into crime novels.

S. by J.J. Abrams and Doug Dorst (5 stars)

Genre: Action, Adventure

For Lost enthusiasts, and fans of J.J. Abrams other works, S. is a fantastic addition to any book collection. It is not only a good read, but also quite the adventure. When you take the book out of the slipcase, you will find a book inside titled Ship of Theseus, filled with pages that are highlighted and notes in the margins, postcards, letters and news clipping, similar to Mark Z. Danielewski’s House of Leaves. S. forces the readers to become a part of the mysteries inside and chronicles two readers, one author and lots of numbers and codes.

So, for the bookworms you still have on your holiday shopping list, get them one of these five best-selling novels for the holidays and you can’t lose.

Kate Voss
@kateevoss