Bookbanter Column: Get Lost in a Good Fantasy Series, Part 2: The Riyria Revelations (July 20, 2012)

Some years ago, author Michael J. Sullivan began writing a fantasy for his daughter: a story that she would enjoy hearing, but also one that he would enjoy reading.

It eventually turned into a six-book epic fantasy series that was published through an independent press.

What was perhaps most unique about the Riyria Revelations was that Sullivan had all six books completely plotted and planned to serve as individual, stand-alone novels, but also linked together into a long series.

The series slowly but surely gained momentum and a following, as more readers and fans were discovered, and the books received more ratings and reviews on the likes of Good Reads and Amazon, and Sullivan received more and more interview requests, including with yours truly.

His popularity and success grew to such a point that after the release of the fifth book in the series, Sullivan finally got that big publishing contract with Orbit Books, who released the series in three volumes late last year and early this year, with two books in each volume.

This is the story of two thieves who change and grow and develop through each of the six books, as readers become so attached to them that by the end they feel like family. It is also the story of what heritage and history means, and that the past is never truly gone, but also that sometimes these things don’t have to matter as much as people think they do, and it’s important to enjoy life however you can.

Theft of Swords: In The Crown Conspiracy our main characters are nothing but low-life thieves: Royce Melborn and Hadrian Blackwater, although they’re very good at their jobs.  The story begins with the introduction of these intrepid characters and their next heist to steal a particular item within the impenetrable confines of the king’s castle.  But as soon as they have their hands on the item, the trap is sprung, and they find themselves part of an elaborate plot.  At their feet lies the lifeless body of the king.

From here, the story kicks into high-gear, taking the reader on a wild ride.  In this world it is important to know who your friends are and who are your enemies; it is also important to keep your enemies closest.  As the story unfolds, we learn that while they may be common thieves, they are very smart people.  They also realize that the idea of being a good person is starting to rub off on them, as they no longer do anything for a fast buck.

By the end of the book, everything seems to have sorted itself out.  Royce and Hadrian are now doing very well for themselves, as well as being close friends of the king.  But clearly all is not as it should, since this is the first book in the series.

In Avempartha, our intrepid duo returns in the second installment of The Riyria Revelations to solve another mystery and fight another day.

Before Royce and Hadrian barely have time to settle after the fun had in The Crown Conspiracy, they find themselves pulled into a new problem: a young woman needs their help as her village is being attacked by an unknown nocturnal creature.

The town of Dahlgren is an idyllic place, except now it is visited each night by an ancient monster looking to terrorize and kill everyone.  Royce and Hadrian know they can’t take on this beast by themselves, at least not without some impressive magic, and call on the help of their old friend and brilliant wizard, Esrahaddon.  Hadrian does his best to protect the town and its people, fortifying it, and having everyone hide out in the fortress each night.  Meanwhile Royce and Esrahaddon journey to the ancient elven tower known as Avempartha.  There they hope to confront the beast and kill it.  But everything doesn’t go according to plan, as it never does, and Hadrian learns some very important things about himself.

Rise of Empire: In Nyphron Rising, things take a turn for the worse as war comes sweeping through to Melengar and its people have little hope and respect for their recent, young king.  Princess Arista has been running around playing diplomat and trying to secure allies for Melengar, with nothing to show for it.  Meanwhile the enemy Nyphron Empire continues to grow in strength and numbers.  Arista has one more trick up her sleeve, and with the help of her good friends, Royce and Hadrian, goes on this last journey far south in a last effort to secure an ally, but also to unravel a mystery of Hadrian’s past.  Surprising results are revealed about our unknown thief that ties into the whole story of the Riyria Revelations.  The wizard Esrahaddon continues to be up to no good, while we learn more of the enigmatic man known as Degan Gaunt.

Sullivan does a great job with Nyphron Rising, after setting necessary groundwork and story and setting with the first two books, he opens it up on an epic scale, traveling his invented world, and educating readers on how future events are going to affect everyone across Elan, and why the forgotten history is important.  Royce and Hadrian continue to be the entertaining and interesting characters that they are, while Arista opens up her emotional side.

With the events of Nyphron Rising now at a close, the elusive duo, Royce and Hadrian aren’t sure what do to next.  Royce has plans to retire and relax, settle down with his lady love and enjoy the rest of his days, while Hadrian has dark shadows of his past and heritage to confront and accept, while deciding he is on a mission to find the lost heir of Novron.  It takes Royce all of three seconds and little convincing to decide that Hadrian won’t last long without him, and together the two set out, following the clues that lead them to the mighty trading vessel, the Emerald Storm.  They know nothing of seamanship and what to do aboard such a large vessel, but knowing one of the crewmen, they’re able to get added to the crew and begin the journey through the mysterious and interesting lands of Elan.  Naturally, there is lots of adventure on the high seas, not to mention some strange guests on the Emerald Storm, as well as the enigmatic cargo.  Meanwhile an important subplot is furthered along with the princess, who is bored with her station, looking to make her life more interesting, and gets some answers.

Heir of Novron: In Wintertide, on this year’s holiday of the same name, a special celebration has been planned.  The New Empire wants to make a big deal of its victory over the Nationalists, and has some important public executions planned: the villainous Degan Gaunt and the Witch of Melengar.  The only problem is that Royce and Hadrian are in town and they happen to be good friends with both of those people and have plans of springing them free whatever it takes.

Sullivan clearly had fun with Wintertide, playing around with Hadrian engaging in a joust, even though he doesn’t know much about the whole nobility and chivalry thing, but he sure knows how to fight.  And how having friends in the most unlikeliest of places often proves invaluable.  Fans will enjoy this penultimate chapter, with Sullivan’s strong descriptions and scenes of the winter festivities; of the sounds, sights and smells.  It’s an enjoyable, thrilling tale before the final showdown.

In Percepliquis, the beginning of the end has begun: the elves of old have crossed the Nidwalden River in large numbers and are coming to take over; they threaten the entire continent of Elan.  The people have little hope left; they know they don’t stand a chance against these powerful elves.  And it all comes down to Novron’s heir, who must make a stand, and the only way he can do that is by finding the sacred horn.  It will involve an arduous quest, with a strong group of warriors who also possess intellect.  They will have to travel deep beneath the ground, in search of the ancient, ruined city of Percepliquis, following an old diary that may not even be true.  Fortunately, Royce and Hadrian are coming along for the ride, so if these intrepid few have any chance of finding the horn and saving the people of Elan, only these two will be able to make it happen.

In the longest volume yet, Sullivan has outdone himself here with lots going on: multiple storylines, lots of action, lots of conflict between friends and enemies, important details from the previous books brought to light, travels through various terrains, and an ultimate duel.  With the thrill of a top-rate action movie, combined with the epic grandeur of Tolkien’s Return of the King, this is a final showdown you won’t be able to stop reading, let alone put down.  Who will live; who will die?  In this grand finale, anything can happen . .. you won’t want to miss it.

Originally published on Forces of Geek.

GUEST POST #1: “A Bit About Contracts” by Michael J. Sullivan

Michael J. Sullivan

 Michael J Sullivan

Michael J. Sullivan is the author of the epic six-book fantasy series, The Riyria Revelations.  Originally published with a small press, the series was picked up this year by Orbit books and is being released in three volumes.  The first, Theft of Swords, released in November, contains the first two volumes.  The second, Rise of Empire, features the third and fourth volumes and came out this month.  The final volume, Heir of Novron, collecting the final two volumes of the series, is due out in January 2012.

This is the first of five posts Michael J. Sullivan will be doing this week on BookBanter.  Check back tomorrow for the next post, or you can subscribe to the BookBanter Blog by entering your email at the top right of the BookBanter Blog page.

Listen to an interview between BookBanter and Michael J. Sullivan.

A Bit About Contracts

Greetings everyone…I want to thank Alex for providing me an opportunity to provide a series of guest posts over the next few days here on BookBanter. He has selected a number of topics that provide some information on the process of publishing and I hope that this helps to peel back the veil of what goes on behind the scenes, and I hope doing so will be of some help to anyone out there that might be an aspiring author.  Today I’m going to speak a bit about contracts.

It should go without saying that you should never sign a contract that gives away the rights to your ideas, world, or characters. The copyright for any written work belongs to the author from the moment they create it, and you should never sell this right. What you do is provide permission for a publisher to create and distribute various formats of your work for a specific amount of time within certain defined geographic areas. There are times when an author may not own the copyright for works they create, for instance in an arrangement known as “work for hire.” In this case the idea is generally coming from the organization that hires the author, and they are the owners of the copyright.

Length of Contract

Some small independent publishers may write their contracts for a given period of time (anywhere from three to seven years) but contracts from the larger big-six publisher are written to be over the term of the copyright of the work.  This means until seventy years after the death of the author, which is a very long time indeed. That being said, most contracts won’t be in effect that long because there are conditions under which the rights revert back to the author. In the “old days” the publishers performed a print run and once all those books were gone, the rights would revert. If the book was popular, the publisher would perform multiple printings and as long as there were books available for sale then the contract remained in force. If a book performs poorly, the publisher might prematurely end the contract by remaindering a book. Keeping books in a warehouse if they aren’t selling is an expensive proposition, so the publisher might choose to sell the books cheaply to a third party (usually by the pound). These are the “bargain books” you sometimes find as new at used bookstores. Because no books are left in the warehouse for sale through normal channels, the books will go “out of print” and the contract would terminate.

In today’s publishing environment it is possible for books to never go “out of print.” Publishers can use print on demand in such a way that they can always have books available for sale with very little investment.  Also, most contracts will purchase both print and ebook rights and making an ebook available to the marketplace costs the publisher nothing.  If the criteria to keep the contract in force is having books “available for sale” then the term could indeed be for the entire life of the copyright.  For this reason modern day contracts should have a clause that indicates what income level is required in order to consider a book still in print. If a book is selling little to no books then the rights should revert to the author. Generally there will be a clause that indicates how many sales per reporting period will determine that the book is still “in print.”

Formats

The contract should clearly define which formats are being sold. In most cases publishers will require print and electronic book rights. How an electronic book is defined should be looked at carefully as technology is changing quickly and books with extended features (sometimes known as enhanced ebooks) which contain added value aspects such as audio or video need to be accounted for. Other possible rights such as movie, television, and merchandising should explicitly be detailed to either remain with the author or available for additional licensing (known as a subsidiary right).

For formats that the publisher does not create themselves, such as: graphic novels, audio books, Braille, book club editions, and the like there will be a clause that states how proceeds from licensing these formats will be shared between the publisher and the author. For instance my publisher has sold book club and audio rights and we share the income from those sales 50/50.

Geographic areas

The most popular choices for geographic areas are worldwide, North American, or English speaking. When worldwide rights are sold, then foreign translations will fall under a subsidiary right and the author and publisher will share the income from any contracts signed.  North American is pretty self explanatory (basically the US and Canada), and English speaking rights extend that to the United Kingdom and Australia.  Because my contract was only for the English language, the sales for Poland, Russia, Spain, France, Germany, Czech Republic, Japan, and Brazil have given me additional income that the publisher did not get a percentage of. If the contract were for worldwide, those sales would have contributed to paying back the advance (see the next section).

Royalties and Advances

The contract will specify the amount that will be advanced to the author. This is usually paid in three installments 1/3 when the contract is signed, 1/3 when the final manuscript is accepted by the publisher, and 1/3 when the book is published.  Any sales made are counted against this advance and no additional money will be paid to the author unless they “earn out”.  (Royalties exceed the amount of the advance). If a subsidiary right is sold by the publisher than the author’s portion will count toward earning out.

Advances are generally considered a “sunk cost” meaning that once paid to the author they don’t have to repay that money if the book performs poorly.  However, if the contract is for multiple books, it is possible that the author won’t get the full advance, as the later books may be cancelled and not actually published.

Readers may be surprised just how little an author makes on each book. Hardcover sales generally pay 10% of list price (which may increase up to 15% based on number of copies sold), while paperbacks will range from 6% – 8%. Print books are based on the books list price (full retail price) whereas audio and ebooks are based on net sales (the amount the publisher actually receives) and are generally 10% for audio CDs and 25% for ebooks and audio books that are downloaded.  I should note that the above royalties are based on big-six contracts and some smaller presses may offer larger percentages especially for ebooks.

Wrap-up

That’s the basics of most contracts. There are a lot of other clauses to the contract that deal with transfer to other parties, what happens in the case of bankruptcy, and clauses that talk about future works. There is too much to go into any detail here, but suffice to say the author should examine the language carefully and make sure that they fully understand what they are signing up for. In particular clauses about competing works may limit what they can write even with regards to other books that are not part of the contract.

So there you have it…Contracts 101. It may not be the most exciting part about the “business of writing” but I hope that this helps to explain a bit about what to expect and what to look out for.  I’ll be back again with some additional guest posts throughout the week. So thank you Alex for sharing your space here at BookBanter.

Help support BookBanter and purchase a copy of Theft of Swords or Rise of Empire.

You might also like . . .

Theft of Swords    Rise of Empire

“Theft of Swords” by Michael J. Sullivan (Orbit, 2011)

Part One of Three

Theft of Swords
starstarstarstar

What began as a challenge to entertain his daughter has taken Michael J. Sullivan on an unusual but productive publishing career, through self-publishing and promotion on to publication with Orbit books.  The Riyria Revelations at first seems a familiar fantasy series, with predictable tropes, but it’s how Sullivan uses them, and its strong, unique and interesting characters, that make this series one well worth reading.  Theft of Swords collects the first two volumes of the six-book series in a nice, weighty quality paperback.

In The Crown Conspiracy our main characters are nothing but low-life thieves: Royce Melborn and Hadrian Blackwater, although they’re very good at their jobs.  The story begins with the introduction of these intrepid characters and their next heist to steal a particular item within the impenetrable confines of the king’s castle.  But as soon as they have their hands on the item, the trap is sprung, and they find themselves part of an elaborate plot.  At their feet lies the lifeless body of the king.

From here, the story kicks into high-gear, taking the reader on a wild ride.  In this world it is important to know who your friends are and who are your enemies; it is also important to keep your enemies closest.  As the story unfolds, we learn that while they may be common thieves, they are very smart people.  They also realize that the idea of being a good person is starting to rub off on them, as they no longer do anything for a fast buck.

By the end of the book, everything seems to have sorted itself out.  Royce and Hadrian are now doing very well for themselves, as well as being close friends of the king.  But clearly all is not as it should, since this is the first book in the series.

In Avempartha, our intrepid duo returns in the second installment of The Riyria Revelations to solve another mystery and fight another day.  Before Royce and Hadrian barely have time to settle after the fun had in The Crown Conspiracy, they find themselves pulled into a new problem: a young woman needs their help as her village is being attacked by an unknown nocturnal creature.

The town of Dahlgren is an idyllic place, except now it is visited each night by an ancient monster looking to terrorize and kill everyone.  Royce and Hadrian know they can’t take on this beast by themselves, at least not without some impressive magic, and call on the help of their old friend and brilliant wizard, Esrahaddon.  Hadrian does his best to protect the town and its people, fortifying it, and having everyone hide out in the fortress each night.  Meanwhile Royce and Esrahaddon journey to the ancient elven tower known as Avempartha.  There they hope to confront the beast and kill it.  But everything doesn’t go according to plan, as it never does, and Hadrian learns some very important things about himself.

Sullivan ramps up the action and story, as we learn more about the characters we’ve come to like, as well about the incredible world he has created.  At the same time more details are revealed about the growing overall story, leaving readers waiting in earnest for the next installment.

This edition also features Sullivan’s original maps and a helpful character and important persons/gods list in the front.  In the back is a detailed glossary, an in-depth interview with the author, and a teaser for the next volume, Rise of Empire, consisting of the third and fourth volumes of the series, due out in December.

Originally written on December 1, 2011 ©Alex C. Telander.

To purchase a copy of Theft of Swords from Amazon, and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

BookBanter’s Top Ten New Releases for Tuesday, November 22

BookBanter's Top Ten New Releases

One of the big things I feel I’ve grown out of touch with since the closing of Borders is my knowledge and awareness of what the new book releases are each Tuesday, and I’m sure some of you also feel that unless you have a bookstore nearby, you don’t have this information readily available either.  So to help improve my awareness and get myself back in the game of knowing what’s new and coming out each week (I used just know this stuff automatically, whether I had read or would be reading any of the new releases or not), as well as to help you readers keep informed, we have BookBanter’s Top Ten New Releases.

So each Tuesday morning there will be a post on the BookBanter Blog and on the BookBanter site giving you my top ten new releases of the week.  I’ll be going through everything I can find coming out for that particular Tuesday and choosing the top ten important ones.  They’ll be mostly hardcovers, with some occasional paperbacks, focusing on Fantasy, Science Fiction, Horror, and occasional Fiction books.

So here’s the top ten new releases for Tuesday, November 22nd.

 

 

 

 


Micro
by Michael Crichton and Richard Preston

Found within the late Michael Crichton’s files, Micro was only a third complete when HarperCollins brought Richard Preston on to complete the book using Crichton’s notes and outlines. In the thrilling style of Jurassic Park, Micro is the terrifying story of that which we cannot see. Three men are found dead, murdered. The only evidence is the bodies riddled with minute cuts and mysterious a tiny-bladed robot.

To purchase a copy from Amazon and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

 

 


Explosive Eighteen
by Janet Evanovich

Janet Evanovich is back with her eighteenth Stephanie Plum novel, and this time she’s pulling out all the stops. Stephanie finds herself immediately getting into trouble as soon as she arrives back in Newark after a terrible vacation in Hawaii. What’s worse is her seatmate never returned during their layover in Los Angeles, and now he’s dead, the body stuffed in a garbage can, and the killer could be anyone, anywhere.

To purchase a copy from Amazon and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

 

 

 

 

Theft of Swords by Michael J. Sullivan

Michael J. Sullivan began his career through small press publishing, and is now joining the grand stage with a big, international publisher. Theft of Swords collects the first two books in the Riyria Revelations series – The Crown Conspiracy and Avempartha. People looking to discover a great new fantasy series should grab Theft of Swords, and meet the infamous and elusive pair of thieves, Hadrian and Royce.

To purchase a copy from Amazon and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

 

 

 

The Third Reich by Robert Bolano

Originally written in 1989, The Third Reich was found amongst Robert Bolano’s papers after his death. This is the thrilling story of death and intrigue, surrounding a brilliant strategy game called The Third Reich, which seems to bear some devastating consequences for anyone who plays it.

To purchase a copy from Amazon and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

 

 

 

New Cthulhu: The Recent Weird edited by Paula Guran

Cthulhu and the works of H. P. Lovecraft have never been more popular. What better way to get started, or perhaps to improve your collection than with this original anthology of Cthulhu stories. Edited by Paula Guran, it features stories from the likes of Neil Gaiman, Sarah Monette, China Mieville, Cherie Priest, Charles Stross and more.

To purchase a copy from Amazon and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

 

 

 

Well-Tempered Clavicle by Piers Anthony

Pier Anthony is back with a new Xanth novel, the 35th, in Well-Tempered Clavicle. The likes of Picka Bones and Joy’nt are off on an adventure with newly arrived creatures from Mundania. Anthony fans will not be disappointed.

To purchase a copy from Amazon and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

 

 

 

Lightspeed Year One by John Joseph Adams

Lightspeed is an award-nominated online science fiction magazine edited by bestselling, renowned editor John Joseph Adams (Living Dead). In Lightspeed Year One, Adams collects the first year of fiction published by the online magazine, featuring the likes of Vylar Kaftan’s “I’m Alive, I Love You, I’ll See you in Reno,” as well as reprints from such great authors as Stephen King, Ursula K. LeGuin, George R. R. Martin and more.

To purchase a copy from Amazon and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

 

 

 

Somewhere Beneath Those Waves by Sarah Monette

From bestselling author Sarah Monette comes the first non-themed collection of her best short fiction. This collection is a great addition to any fan of Monette’s work, and for anyone looking to try out this great author for the first time, Somewhere Beneath Those Waves is a perfect place to start.

To purchase a copy from Amazon and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

 

 

 

Autumn Disintegration by David Moody

The penultimate chapter in the terrifying horror series from David Moody, Autumn Disintegration reveals a world forty days after its end, where billions of corpses now walk the earth. There is one group of eleven, fighting to survive, doing whatever it takes, while another group employs tactics, subtlety and planning to keep themselves alive. Moody skillfully brings the two groups together, as they all know the final battle is about to begin.

To purchase a copy from Amazon and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

 

 

 

When the Saints by Dave Duncan

From author Dave Duncan comes the great sequel to Speak to the Devil. When the Saints picks up where Duncan left off: Anton Magnus must defend the castle from the attacking neighboring state, but fortunately Cardice has a secret weapon in Wulfgang Magnus. Only Wulfgang must choose which side he is to fight on, and whether the love for one beautiful Madlenka will sway him.

To purchase a copy from Amazon and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

11/18 On the Bookshelf . . . “Settlers of Catan” & “Theft of Swords”

Settlers of Catan  Theft of Swords

Think of it as Settlers of Catan the book, which is exactly what it is, from a German author — Rebecca Gable — who has studied Old English and is a big fan of the Middle Ages.  And then there is Theft of Swords the first (joined) volume of the Riyria Revelations from Orbit Books (originally published as The Crown Conspiracy and Avempartha).