BOOK RECOMMENDATION: Every Night’s Friday Night: Time and Freedom for the Rest of Your Life by Andrea R. Huff

Every Nights Friday Night book_cover_photo

Retirement is one of the biggest decisions you’ll ever make in your life, so make sure you have the correct tools to do it

Are you ready to transition from a full time career into active retirement? It’s a wonderful opportunity to shift gears and focus on what you want to do, and who you want to become. So many retired people say they are busier than when they were working. The question is, are you following your calling and living life on your terms? Do you know who you really want to be at this stage of your life? Do you know what will give you the greatest sense of purpose and satisfaction?

The third stage of life is an opportunity to shift gears and focus only on what you want to do and who you want to become. Some people have it figured out, but many don’t, and end up feeling like they’re spending time on busywork, property maintenance, appointments, or whatever activity demands their time. Leisure is fun for a while, but even people who didn’t like their jobs much find that they miss working. They haven’t found a roadmap to transition to a new life of purpose. Every Night’s Friday Night is your guide to creating that roadmap.

Review from San Francisco Book Review:

What do you do when you can’t find a book that addresses the issues you want to hear about? You write it! Author Andrea R. Huff’s book Every Night’s Friday Night is a book about the third stage of a person’s life when they are about to retire. Retiring can be a scary thought for some people. What am I going to do with all that spare time? How do I know if I have enough money saved up to retire? What do other people do after retiring? All of these questions are addressed in this book. A fascinating group of people was selected by Huff to be interviewed about how they prepared (or didn’t prepare) to retire and the tips they would give others who are retiring. Huff gives the reader several resources so that he or she can research the suggestions given by her interviewees. I found this book to be extremely informative and loved the ideas of downsizing and traveling the world on a simple budget when retiring. All of the interviewees were so different, ranging from an attorney who never planned for retirement at all and who considers himself a “lucky pessimist” to a corporate bigwig who retired to become a civil volunteer. The author herself was a coach and consultant by trade who found that, among other things, she loves to repurpose jewelry both for herself and others. She addresses the importance of having your partner on the same page to make things a lot easier. As someone in the fitness industry, I loved that the author talked about the importance of staying healthy and fit as we age. There are several books that the author listed that I will be reading, such as Pain Free by Pete Egoscue. A book for all ages, even those who are not in the third stage yet.

Reviewed By: Kristi Elizabeth

Book may be purchased at http://EveryNightsFridayNight.com

Author Bio:

Andrea Huff is an expert coach and consultant for people entering the third stage of their lives – ages 50+. From her background as an Executive Team member and the founder of the Executive Coaching practice for the global career and leadership consulting firm, Lee Hecht Harrison, she coached thousands of clients to identify the next stages of their careers. Now in her own practice, Third Stage of Life Consulting, she created a holistic process to help people prepare for an active retirement outlined in her book, Every Night’s Friday Night: Time and Freedom for the Rest of Your Life.

BOOK RECOMMENDATION: A Tool Case For Language Learning: 40 Tools to Become a Top-Notch Language Learner by Nagi An

A Tool Case For Language Learning:
40 Tools to Become a Top-Notch Language Learner
by Nagi An

toolcase for language learning cover

Learn how you should be learning a language the right way!

You can approach language learning from many different perspectives. You may think that the best way to learn is through immersion and seek an opportunity to live in a foreign country for a while. Maybe you are good at memorizing lists and therefore tend to learn best by applying mnemonics techniques. Some learn via song, some prefer flashcards, and others learn by watching movies with subtitles. Other approaches include keeping a diary to reflect upon your performance and reading a lot of material in the target language.

Until we know what other techniques or tools exist beyond what we already know or apply, we can’t be sure that we are learning in the way that suits us best. It’s essential to experiment with tools we haven’t tried before to determine the most effective ways for us to learn.

In this book, there are 40 such tools for learning languages. The aim is to show you why, how, and when certain tools work, and to give you a thorough understanding of the techniques you can employ as you are learning languages.

Try them all, experiment with them, and mix and match to create a personalized process for yourself.

You are different from other language learners. That’s why your learning path should be different, too.

Build a language learning path that is right for you.

From the San Francisco Book Review:

It’s easy to get stuck in a rut, especially when it comes to how we approach learning new things. Yet if we do not experiment with learning methods, how can we truly know that we’re getting optimal results?

In A Tool Case for Language Learning: 40 Tools to Become a Top-Notch Language Learner, author Nagi An provides readers with a wide variety of tools to utilize when learning a new language. “People learn in different ways and for different reasons,” An writes. “Until we know what other techniques or tools exist beyond what we already know or apply, we can’t be sure that we are learning in the way that suits us best.”

The first part of this reference guide is designed for beginning language learners, focusing on vocabulary acquisition, and the second offers more advanced speakers ideas for improving their reading, writing, and conversational skills. The tools and techniques are based on what the author used as she was learning German, Spanish, English, and Japanese.

The author offers sound advice and backs it up with scientific studies as well as useful examples. And she advises learners to try a variety of tools and to mix and match them in order to create a personalized learning process. In Utilizing Tool Number 1, An recommends looking for ways to group vocabulary words by theme or family. Smaller chunks are easier to memorize than long lists.

The Feynman Technique, Tool Number 15, is brilliant. Choose a topic, learn about it, then articulately explain the concept to yourself or to another person in clear, straightforward language. If you’re unable to do so, you do not thoroughly understand the subject and need to learn more. The process starts again.

Tool Number 35 is one of my favorites: making mistakes as a speaking technique. “If you want to become fluent, perfectionism can be your enemy,” An writes. “Start making mistakes as early as possible, as this will allow you to get early feedback to learn from.”

A Tool Case for Language Learning offers helpful advice for anyone learning a new language. While some professional formatting and copyediting are suggested, it’s an easy read offering excellent advice. I would recommend it to students and teachers alike, as it significantly expands the memory tools available to them at home or in the classroom. An’s techniques are useful and scientifically sound. One could take these tools and successfully master any new subject they set their mind to.

Reviewed by Jennifer Melville

Purchase book through Amazon.

Author Bio

I’m committed to understanding how we learn and create in adulthood. On the one hand, by increasing awareness of effective learning strategies, we can learn faster. Experimenting with different tools allows us to unleash what works best for us. On the other hand, the most desired outputs of learning are exploring and creating. That’s why I do research in both areas – how knowledge building and understanding work, and how we can improve skills like ideation, analyzing and evaluating – so that we can be more productive and creative. I write books and design courses based on the findings of my research, trips I take and experiments I carry out on my small business. To read nuggets of my current work, you can visit www.bynagi.com

Bookbanter’s Best Reads of 2017

 

Reviews:

Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann

Paradox Bound by Peter Clines

The Prey of Gods by Nicky Drayden

New York 2140 by Kim Stanley Robinson

Agents of Dreamland by Caitlin R. Kiernan

Darkness of Evil by Alan Jacobson

Change Agent by Daniel Suarez

“Paradox Bound” by Peter Clines (Crown, 2017)

paradoxbound

Much like with his previous book The Fold, Peter Clines’s new book, Paradox Bound, sucks you right in from the very beginning as we are introduced to our main character, Eli Teague, who meets a woman three times during his life – as a kid, teen, and adult – while she never seems to age at all. But that’s because she’s a time traveler.

While Eli only saw her for short moments in time over his young life, the woman has become an obsession for him in her steampunked Model-A Ford, as he wonders when she might show up in his life again. He lives in Sanders, a dead-end town that feels like it hasn’t changed a bit in fifty years. When he meets her as an adult, in her now familiar revolutionary garb and tricorne hat, he won’t let her go and finally gets taken under her wing and made her time traveling apprentice.

In this world there are old, forgotten roads that if you ride them just right and skid through at just the right point, you can fall through time. There are a number of these time travelers all with the same goal in mind. They are looking for the American Dream. Because it was stolen during the 1960s. And whoever finds it can fix their life and make this world a better place. The problem is there are also the guardians of the American Dream who are looking to get it back, and will attack anyone traveling through time, because they’re a threat and a risk.

In many ways Paradox Bound might be considered the quintessential American novel, as its characters are all literally searching for the American Dream in a riveting, exciting chase across the country and its history. Clines keeps the pace going and the reader hooked, wanting to know how it’s going to end. For Neil Gaiman fans, Paradox Bound could easily be considered the American Neverwhere, as it is in many ways an equally good novel.

Originally written on November 20, 2017 ©Alex C. Telander.

To purchase a copy of Paradox Bound from Amazon, and help support BookBanter, click HERE.

 

Books Read in 2017

When I come to put together my “books read” list at the beginning of a new year, I always spend way to much time organizing and structuring and finagling so it looks right in a post, when I should’ve been doing something else all along.

This year I’m electing to just provide a link to my Goodreads account that shows you all the glorious covers the books I read last year in one great layout, with minimal work involved.

And here you have it . . .

Ostium Mini Episode: “Stocking Up (Monica’s Version)”

Jake and Monica decide the need a little break from Ostium town proper, and decide to go on a bit of joyride. Get a bite to eat in the nearest town and get some supplies.

This is Monica’s take on the trip.

Music by Axletree, courtesy of the Free Music Archive.

Ostium now has a merchandise store, check it out.

If you want more Ostium, why not become a patron on our Patreon page, where for just $2 a month you’ll get access to an exclusive brand new mini episode every two weeks (and this includes all through the offseason); and during the regular season of the show you’ll get access to new episodes a full week before everyone else. Alternatively, you could also make a one-time donation and help support Ostium on our website, www.ostiumpodcast.com.

And if you wouldn’t mind leaving Ostium a review on whatever app or program you use to listen to podcasts and that way people can see what you’re saying to convince them to listen to Ostium.

Thanks for listening and see you in two weeks for Monica’s take on this interesting trip!

 

Ostium Mini Episode: “Stocking Up (Jake’s Version)

Jake and Monica decide the need a little break from Ostium town proper, and decide to go on a bit of joyride. Get a bite to eat in the nearest town and get some supplies.
This is Jake’s take on the trip.

Music by Axletree, courtesy of the Free Music Archive.

Ostium now has a merchandise store, check it out.

If you want more Ostium, why not become a patron on our Patreon page, where for just $2 a month you’ll get access to an exclusive brand new mini episode every two weeks (and this includes all through the offseason); and during the regular season of the show you’ll get access to new episodes a full week before everyone else. Alternatively, you could also make a one-time donation and help support Ostium on our website, www.ostiumpodcast.com.

And if you wouldn’t mind leaving Ostium a review on whatever app or program you use to listen to podcasts and that way people can see what you’re saying to convince them to listen to Ostium.

Thanks for listening and see you in two weeks for Monica’s take on this interesting trip!